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I have the following time series data. It has 60 data points shown below. Please see a simple plot of this data below. I am using R for plotting this. I think that if I draw a moving average curve on the points in the graph, then we can better understand the patterns in the data. I don't know how to do it in R. Could some one help me to do that. Additionally, I am not sure whether this is a good way to identify patterns or not. Please also suggest me if there is any better way. Thank you.

x <- c(18,21,18,14,8,14,10,14,14,12,12,14,10,10,12,6,10,8,
       14,10,10,6,6,4,6,2,8,6,2,6,4,4,2,8,6,6,8,12,8,8,6,6,2,2,4,
       4,4,8,14,8,6,6,2,6,6,4,4,8,6,6)

graph

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with regard to "is this a good way to identify patterns" (which is a little off-topic for StackOverflow, but whatever); I think rolling means are perfectly respectable, although more sophisticated methods (such as the locally-weighted regression [loess/lowess] shown in my answer) do exist. However, it doesn't look to me as though there is much of a complicated pattern to detect here: the data seem to initially decline with time, then level off. Rolling means and more sophisticated approaches may look prettier, but I don't think they will identify any deeper patterns in this data set ... –  Ben Bolker Jan 23 '13 at 22:51
    
@Ben: Thank you for your thoughts. I agree with you that there may not be many patterns. But I have a total of 37 data sets. I see that rolling helps me in identifying the patterns in them. –  samarasa Jan 24 '13 at 0:21

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

To answer your question about moving averages, you could accomplish it with the help of rollmean which is in package zoo.

From Joshua's comment: You could also look into TTR package that depends on xts that depends on zoo. Also, there are other moving averages in the package TTR: check ?MA.

require(TTR)
# assuming your vector is loaded in dat
# sliding window / moving average of size 5
dat.k5 <- rollmean(dat, k=5)
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2  
rollmean is in zoo. TTR depends on xts, which depends on zoo. TTR does have many other types of moving averages though, see ?MA. –  Joshua Ulrich Jan 23 '13 at 15:42

One reasonable possibility:

d <- data.frame(x=scan("tmp.dat"))
qplot(x=seq(nrow(d)),x,data=d)+geom_smooth(method="loess")

edit: moved from comment to answer, based on http://meta.stackexchange.com/questions/164783/why-was-a-seemingly-relevant-non-offensive-comment-removed

With regard to "is this a good way to identify patterns" (which is a little off-topic for StackOverflow, but whatever); I think rolling means are perfectly respectable, although more sophisticated methods (such as the locally-weighted regression [loess/lowess] shown here) do exist. However, it doesn't look to me as though there is much of a complicated pattern to detect here: the data seem to initially decline with time, then level off. Rolling means and more sophisticated approaches may look prettier, but I don't think they will identify any deeper patterns in this data set ...

If you want to do this sort of thing for multiple data sets at once (as indicated in your comment), you may like ggplot's capabilities for automatically producing multi-line or faceted versions of the same plot.

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