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I have a very large text file which contains data similar to the following:

     but/CC as/IN 1/Z church/NP historian/NN/Fc 
     as/IN 1/Z "/Fe rupture/NN and/CC new/JJ beginning/NN century/NN ./Fp
    ======>match found: \#\#[a-z]+\/NN\#\#
    ======>match found: be\/V[A-Z]+(\s[.]{0,10})?\#\#
    ======>match found: \#\#\sof\/IN

I would like to use the (linux) terminal command grep to match and erase all the lines that start with:

======>match found:

and end with a newline character.

Thus, according to the previous example, I'd like to run grep and obtain the following output

but/CC as/IN 1/Z church/NP historian/NN/Fc as/IN 1/Z "/Fe rupture/NN and/CC new/JJ beginning/NN century/NN ./Fp

Thank you in advance for your help

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1  
whathaveyoutried.com –  Gung Foo Jan 23 '13 at 15:19
    
grep -i "^======>match found:[.]\\n" ./mybigfile.txt –  Albz Jan 23 '13 at 15:22
    
Please go back and edit your question to show us what you tried, and then to explain what didn't work, and how exactly it didn't work. –  Andy Lester Jan 23 '13 at 15:31
    
I'm not an expert in regex and I couldn't find the regex that matched exactly the pattern I needed, therefore the output was always similar to the input file, that's why I didn't post an example. –  Albz Jan 23 '13 at 15:56

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted
grep -E -v '^======>match found:.+$' file.txt

-E turns on extended regular expressions, and -v negates the output, i.e. prints all lines that don't match.

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Sed is your friend

sed -i '/^======>match found:/d' largefilename.txt

will delete all occurrences of lines starting with ======>match found:

Note, the -i switch means that the largefilename.txt will be modified rather than printed to stdout, which should be more efficient than using grep.

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