Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I have an arraylist of Strings that want to have all possible combinations stored into another collection.

For example:

[air,bus,car]
->
[air]
[bus]
[car]
[air,bus]
[air,car]
[bus,air]
[bus,car]
[car,air]
[car,bus]
[air,bus,car]
[air,car,bus]
...
[car,bus,air]

Repetitions are not important. The code right now I have is:

public ArrayList<String> comb(ArrayList<String> wrds, ArrayList<String> str, int size)
{
    ArrayList<String> s = new ArrayList<String>();
    s.addAll(str);
    if(size != a1.size())
    {
        Iterator e = a1.iterator();
        while(e.hasNext())
        {
            s.add((String)e.next());
        }
        size++;
    }
}

I am trying to get it to recursively call itself so it can store the combinations. Can I get any help as to where or which part I am missing in my code?

share|improve this question
    
If this is homework, tag it as such. Where is a1 coming from? –  Rob Goodwin Jan 23 '13 at 16:26
    
Suppose it's homework. The variable a1 is the arraylist of [air,bus,car]. –  user2004440 Jan 23 '13 at 16:33
    
You are missing the recursive call itself. –  Maroun Maroun Jan 23 '13 at 16:37
    
Yup, that is why I asked for assistance. I'm stumped. –  user2004440 Jan 23 '13 at 16:39
    
I think the homework tag has been deprecated. –  xpda Jan 23 '13 at 16:43

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Seeing as this is homework, I'll try to give you background to the answer.

The key to solving this is to use recursion.

First imagine you have two items in your array. You'd could remove the first item to give you your first combination. Adding the remaining item to the first item gives you the second combination. Removing the second item give you the third combination. Adding the remaining item gives you the forth combination. If you had ["air", "bus"] it'd be something like:

["air"]
["air", "bus"]
["bus"]
["bus", "air"]

A method that returns that might look like:

String[][] combinations(String[] strings)

The important things to note are the an array containing a single string can be passed to this method and it can return an array containing an array with a single string in it.

The problem is complicated a little because you have to keep a tally of the string combinations, so before we get to solving that, it's important that you understand recursion.

Imagine you wanted to write a multiplication method that takes two numbers and multiplies them but you only have addition and subtraction at your disposal. You could write a recursive function that adds one of the numbers to itself until the other number reaches an exit condition, something like:

public int multiply(int value1, int value2) 
{
  if (value1 > 1) 
  {
    int remaining = value1 - 1;
    return value2 + multiply(remaining, value2);
  }
  else 
  {
    return value2;
  }
}

You can do just the same thing with an array, only instead to exiting when the a value hit's 1 you exit when the array contains one item, something like:

public String[][] combinations(String[] strings) 
{
  if (strings.length > 1) 
  {
    ...
  }
  else 
  {
    return new String[][]{strings};
  }
}

For reasons with the Java API it's much easier to use java.util.List rather than arrays so you want something like:

public List<List<String>> combinations(List<String> strings) 
{
  if (strings.size()> 1) 
  {
    ...
  }
  else 
  {
    List<List<String>> result = new ArrayList<List<String>>();
    result.add(strings);
    return result;
  }
}

Now it's the ... that's the important bit. You need to keep an list-of-lists that will be the result and iterate over the strings. For each of the strings you can add that string to the results and then you need create a sub-list that is minus the current string, which you use to call the combinations method again iterating over the result adding the current string each list it contains. In code it looks something like:

public List<List<String>> combinations(List<String> strings) 
{
  if (strings.size() > 1) 
  {
    List<List<String>> result = new ArrayList<List<String>>();

    for (String str : strings) 
    {
      List<String> subStrings = new ArrayList<String>(strings);
      subStrings.remove(str);

      result.add(new ArrayList<String>(Arrays.asList(str)));

      for (List<String> combinations : combinations(subStrings)) 
      {
        combinations.add(str);
        result.add(combinations);
      }
    }

    return result;
  }
  else 
  {
    List<List<String>> result = new ArrayList<List<String>>();
    result.add(new ArrayList<String>(strings));
    return result;
  }
}

In summary, what you're doing is reducing the list of strings down to a single item, then combining it with the preceeding items to produce all the possible combinations as the thread returns up the call stack.

share|improve this answer
    
Your explanation was really clear. Thank you very much! I had the feeling I needed a list of a list, but did not know how I would use it. Back to the recursion, I'm starting to understand it a lot better. I appreciate it, Nick! –  user2004440 Jan 23 '13 at 21:29
1  
You're welcome, though nothing says thank you better than an up-vote and accepting the answer. –  Nick Holt Jan 24 '13 at 8:17
    
Sorry about that. Though I can't upvote because I do not have more than 15, I accepted the answer. Thanks for reminding. –  user2004440 Jan 28 '13 at 3:40
    
just what I was looking for. Great answer Nick –  sunrize920 May 22 '13 at 14:27

Use the list as a parameter to the recursive function. You can call the function from within itself with a new list containing everything except the first item.

share|improve this answer
    
But I still not sure how to add each of them into the arraylist or maybe even an array of arraylist. –  user2004440 Jan 23 '13 at 17:07

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.