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I am having trouble performing data type validation which is dependent on another field. Most of the examples I found here are for making a field required or not based on a value of another field (MaidenName will be required only if IsMarried is true).

My Model

public class AttributeValuesModel
{
    public IList<AttributeModel> Values {get; set;}
}

public class AttributeModel
{
    [Required]
    public string AttributeName {get; set;}

    [Required]
    public string AttributeValue {get; set;}

    [Required]
    public int DataTypeId {get; set;}
}

What I would like to do is to validate the user input for AttributeValue based on the value of DataTypeId. For clarity, the value of DataTypeId is known before I even show the view to the user.

    //Possible values for DataTypeId are 
    //1 for decimal
    //2 for dates
    //3 for integer

Is this possible?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

It's not so hard to roll your own validation attribute. I have implemented one some time ago. It checks whether value of other property is smaller than property that is decorated with this attribiute:

[AttributeUsage(AttributeTargets.Property, AllowMultiple = true, Inherited=true)]
public class SmallerThanAttribute : ValidationAttribute
{
    public SmallerThanAttribute(string otherPropertyName)
    {
        this.OtherPropertyName = otherPropertyName;
    }

    public string OtherPropertyName { get; set; }
    public string OtherPropertyDisplayName { get; set; }

    protected override ValidationResult IsValid(object value, ValidationContext validationContext)
    {
        return IsValid(OtherPropertyName, value, validationContext);
    }

    private ValidationResult IsValid(string otherProperty, object value, ValidationContext validationContext)
    {
        PropertyInfo otherPropertyInfo = validationContext.ObjectType.GetProperty(otherProperty);

        if (otherPropertyInfo == null)
        {
            throw new Exception("Could not find property: " + otherProperty);
        }

        var displayAttribute = otherPropertyInfo.GetCustomAttributes(typeof(DisplayAttribute), true).FirstOrDefault() as DisplayAttribute;

        if (displayAttribute != null && OtherPropertyDisplayName == null)
        {
            OtherPropertyDisplayName = displayAttribute.GetName();
        }

        object otherPropertyValue = otherPropertyInfo.GetValue(validationContext.ObjectInstance, null);

        var smaller = (IComparable) value;
        var bigger = (IComparable) otherPropertyValue;

        if (smaller == null || bigger == null)
        {
            return null;
        }

        if (smaller.CompareTo(bigger) > 0)
        {
            return new ValidationResult(string.Format(ValidatorResource.SmallerThan, validationContext.DisplayName, OtherPropertyDisplayName));
        }

        return null;
    }
}

There is one gotcha. Error message format is defined in resource class property (ValidatorResource.SmallerThan), so it's not pluggable -- I didn't need this. However, I think it still could be a good starting point for you.

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You may take a look at the FoolProof validation extensions for ASP.NET MVC. They contain validation attributes which could be used to perform conditional validation such as [RequiredIf].

And an even more powerful validation library (and the one that I use and recommend) is FluentMVC. Contrary to validation data annotations this library allows you to perform imperative validation instead of declarative. This allows you to express rules of arbitrary complexity and between dependent properties.

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I've seen FoolProof before posting my question but I think they don't do data type validations. The closest that they have is [RequiredIfRegExMatch] and [RequiredIfNotRegExMatch] which I feel is a bit pushing it to the limit to do data type validations. I'll check FluentMVC as it has a mention of DataType in the Model Template section (bottom of the page). –  Andy Refuerzo Jan 23 '13 at 16:42
    
Well then with FluentMVC you get all the joy (and power). –  Darin Dimitrov Jan 23 '13 at 16:47
    
Since you said that you've used FluentMVC, I was wondering if you've used the built-in DataType template in a similar situation as I am in now? Meaning that the data type validation fires only when the dependency to another field has been met. –  Andy Refuerzo Jan 23 '13 at 16:51
    
Yes of course. That's quite a common scenario. –  Darin Dimitrov Jan 23 '13 at 16:51
    
I tried FluentMVC and this is what I got working: context.RulesFor(x=> x.AttributeValue).Required(c => c.Message("not valid").StopOnFail()); but this one doesn't context.RulesFor(model => model.AttributeValue).Required(c => c.Message("not valid").When(x => x.DataTypeId == 1).StopOnFail()); Somehow, DataTypeId is always 0. What did I miss? :) –  Andy Refuerzo Jan 23 '13 at 18:45

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