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I have following string:

string source = "Test/Company/Business/Department/Logs.tvs/v1";

The / character is the separator between various elements in the string. I need to get the last two elements of the string. I have following code for this purpose. This works fine. Is there any faster/simpler code for this?

CODE

    static void Main()
    {
        string component = String.Empty;
        string version = String.Empty;
        string source = "Test/Company/Business/Department/Logs.tvs/v1";
        if (!String.IsNullOrEmpty(source))
        {
            String[] partsOfSource = source.Split('/');
            if (partsOfSource != null)
            {
                if (partsOfSource.Length > 2)
                {
                    component = partsOfSource[partsOfSource.Length - 2];
                }

                if (partsOfSource.Length > 1)
                {
                    version = partsOfSource[partsOfSource.Length - 1];
                }
            }
        }

        Console.WriteLine(component);
        Console.WriteLine(version);
        Console.Read();
    }
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7 Answers 7

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Why no regular expression? This one is fairly easy:

.*/(?<component>.*)/(?<version>.*)$

You can even label your groups so for your match all you need to do is:

component = myMatch.Groups["component"];
version = myMatch.Groups["version"];
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1  
It's a shame you can't make the regex engine match "from-the-right" in cases like this. –  Rawling Jan 23 '13 at 16:47
1  
@Rawling: Agreed. I guess you could reverse the string first, but that's probably even less efficient. Actually, I wonder if it isn't possible for a RegEx engine to incorporate that kind of optimization when an expression has a $ but no ^. –  Matt Burland Jan 23 '13 at 16:49
2  
... OK, Today I Learned you can do something like Regex.Match(source, "/(.*?)/(.*?)$", RegexOptions.RightToLeft), or even without the $ in this case. –  Rawling Jan 23 '13 at 16:53
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The following should be faster, as it only scans as much of the string as it needs to to find two / and it doesn't bother splitting up the whole string:

string component = "";
string version = "";
string source = "Test/Company/Business/Department/Logs.tvs/v1";
int last = source.LastIndexOf('/');
if (last != -1)
{
    int penultimate = source.LastIndexOf('/', last - 1);
    version = source.Substring(last + 1);
    component = source.Substring(penultimate + 1, last - penultimate - 1);
}

That said, as with all performance questions: profile! Try the two side-by-side with a big list of real-life inputs and see which is fastest.

(Also, this will leave empty strings rather than throw an exception if there is no slash in the input... but throw if source is null, lazy me.)

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This sounds like premature optimization. It's highly unlikely that splitting this string is going to be a performance bottleneck. –  StriplingWarrior Jan 23 '13 at 17:41
    
Still, when OP has asked for faster/simpler code... –  Rawling Jan 23 '13 at 20:18
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Your approach is the most suitable one given that your are looking for substrings at a particular index. A LINQ expression to do the same in this case will likely not improve the code or its readability.

For reference, there is some great information from Microsoft here on working with strings and LINQ. In particular see the article here which covers some examples with both LINQ and RegEx.

EDIT: +1 For Matt's named group within RegEx approach... that's the nicest solution I've seen.

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Your code mostly looks fine. A couple of points to note:

  1. String.Split() will never return null, so you don't need the null check on it.
  2. If the source string has fewer than two / characters, how would you deal with that? (The Original Post was updated to address this)
  3. Do you really want to just output empty strings if your source string is null or empty (or invalid)? If you have specific expectations about the nature of the input, you may want to consider failing fast when those expectations are not met.
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You could try something like this but I doubt it would be much faster. You could do some meassurements with System.Diagnostics.StopWatch to see if you feel the need.

string source = "Test/Company/Business/Department/Logs.tvs/v1";

int index1 = source.LastIndexOf('/');
string last = source.Substring(index1 + 1);

string substring = source.Substring(0, index1);
int index2 = substring.LastIndexOf('/');
string secondLast = substring.Substring(index2 + 1);
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I would try

        string source = "Test/Company/Business/Department/Logs.tvs/v1";

        var components = source.Split('/').Reverse().Take(2);

        String last = string.Empty;

        var enumerable = components as string[] ?? components.ToArray();
        if (enumerable.Count() == 2)
            last = enumerable.FirstOrDefault();
        var secondLast = enumerable.LastOrDefault();

Hope this will help

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Interesting... Thanks –  Lijo Jan 23 '13 at 17:34
1  
@Lijo edited my answer with some refactoring from R# and added support for components.Count < 2 ( Hope this will help ) –  jbl Jan 23 '13 at 17:44
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you can retrieve the last two words using the process as below:

string source = "Test/Company/Business/Department/Logs.tvs/v1";

 String[] partsOfSource = source.Split('/');
if(partsOfSourch.length>2)
 for(int i=partsOfSourch.length-2;i<=partsOfSource.length-1;i++)
console.writeline(partsOfSource[i]);
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