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I'm a newbie to Perl and I found this test CGI script in my Apache installation and I would like to know what it does, especially in one of the two s/// lines.

#!/usr/bin/perl

print "Content-type: text/plain; charset=iso-8859-1\n\n";
foreach $var (sort(keys(%ENV))) {
    $val = $ENV{$var};
    $val =~ s|\n|\\n|g;
    $val =~ s|"|\\"|g;
    print "${var}=\"${val}\"\n";
}

The $val =~ s|\n|\\n|g; line replaces every occurrence of \n with \\n. But why?

And what about the $val =~ s|"|\\"|g; line? I think it's a substitution, but it seems to have a weird form.

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Oh, and don't be thrown by the use of '|' instead of '/' - perl lets you do that... (mainly because, when working with html, it's nice not to have to constantly escape '/') –  Tom Melly Jan 23 '13 at 16:56
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3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The $val =~ s|\n|\\n|g; line replaces every occurrence of \n with \\n.

More precisely, it replaces each new line with a common escape sequence that represents a new line.

But why?

There lies the land of pure speculation. The content-type is text/plain so there is no obvious reason to do it.

$val =~ s|"|\\"|g; line? I think it's a substitution, but it seems to have a weird form.

It replaces " with an escape sequence representing a " in many contexts (but not plain text). Again, there is no obvious reason to do it from the context it is presented in.


To hazard a guess. It looks like it is designed to dump the server's environment to a text file from which it can be copy/pasted to be used elsewhere.

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"It looks like it is designed to dump the server's environment to a text file from which it can be copy/pasted to be used elsewhere." Yes. This is what I was getting at in my answer, when I said "Looks like it's trying to escape stuff for some other level of evaluation", but this way of putting it is clearer. –  DWright Jan 23 '13 at 17:17
    
I thought that "|\\" was a string to be interpreted as it is. Maybe I was misled by the coloring of my text-editor. –  JustTrying Jan 24 '13 at 8:23
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Your explanation of the first substitution is correct. The second substitution is similar: it replaces each occurrence of " with \".

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Looks like it's trying to escape stuff for some other level of evaluation. I.e. something else is going to need to see \n, but that something else would not see one \ as a literal \, so it needs it escaped first, \\. Same goes for the ". Something else needs it escaped as a literal, i.e., \", and it first needs to ensure that the \ is preserved as a literal \ via \\.

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