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What's wrong with this code?

class MyList(list):
  def __init__(self, li): self = li

When I create an instance of MyList with, for example, MyList([1, 2, 3]), and then I print this instance, all I get is an empty list []. If MyDict is subclassing list, isn't MyDict a list itself?

NB: both in Python 2.x and 3.x.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 11 down vote accepted

You need to call the list initializer:

class MyList(list):
     def __init__(self, li):
         super(MyList, self).__init__(li)

Assigning to self in the function just replaces the local variable with the list, not assign anything to the instance:

>>> class MyList(list):
...      def __init__(self, li):
...          super(MyList, self).__init__(li)
... 
>>> ml = MyList([1, 2, 3])
>>> ml
[1, 2, 3]
>>> len(ml)
3
>>> type(ml)
<class '__main__.MyList'>
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Would list.__init__(self) also work when inheriting from list? –  Wolf Sep 24 '14 at 12:51
    
@Wolf: yes, but that'd preclude multiple inheritance, e.g. using this class as a base together with another class. list might not be the next class in the MRO in such cases. –  Martijn Pieters Sep 24 '14 at 14:29
    
Thanks for pointing on that! The short answer I already found here: Subclassing Built-in Types. MRO I hope I correctly resolved to Method Resolution Order. –  Wolf Sep 24 '14 at 14:38
    
@Wolf: yes, sorry. MRO stands for Method Resolution Order, the order in which base classes are searched to resolve a requested method. –  Martijn Pieters Sep 24 '14 at 14:39

I figured it out on my own: self is an instance of a subclass of list, so it can't be casted to list still being a MyList object.

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1  
No, self is a reference to an instance of MyList. Python doesn't have casting. See Martijn Pieter's answer. –  chepner Jan 23 '13 at 16:55

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