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I have done the following function to reverse a string:

char* reverseString(char *original_string)
{
    int length = strlen(original_string);
    char *end_of_string = original_string + (length - 1);
    char *reversed_string = malloc(sizeof(char) * length);

    int count = 0;
    int top_limit = length;

    while (count < length) {
        reversed_string[count] = end_of_string[top_limit];
        top_limit--;
        count++;
    }

    return reversed_string;
}

The strategy that I was planning is to put a pointer at the end of the original string and go backwards copying into a new string. I am not sure what am I doing wrong here, but when doing:

char* prova = "hello";
char* reversed_string;
reversed_string = reverseString(prova);
printf("%d", strlen(reversed_string));

It doesn't show me the correct length, and in compile time I get the following warning:

test.c:46: warning: format ‘%d’ expects type ‘int’, but argument 2 has type ‘size_t’
share|improve this question
1  
Try to change the format specifier to %u – StoryTeller Jan 23 '13 at 16:59
    
You're not null terminating reversed_string, nor are you allocating space for it. – Carey Gregory Jan 23 '13 at 17:05
up vote 2 down vote accepted

The type returned by strlen is size_t, which is an unsigned type. Using %d format to print it is in an undefined behavior. You can either use %zu in C99, or use %u and cast to unsigned int in C89.

#include <string.h>

/* C89 */ printf("%u\n", (unsigned int)strlen(reversed_string));
/* C99 */ printf("%zu\n", strlen(reversed_string));

C11 (n1570), § 7.19 Common definitions <stddef.h>
size_t, which is the unsigned integer type of the result of the sizeof operator [...].

Your algorithm is also wrong, because you use both end_of_string and top_limit. You should choose one of the two solutions.

#include <string.h>

char *reverseString(char *original_string)
{
    size_t length = strlen(original_string);
    char *reversed_string = malloc(length + 1);
    size_t start;
    size_t end;

    for (start = 0, end = length - 1; start < length; start++, end--)
    {
      reversed_string[start] = original_string[end];
    }

    reversed_string[start] = '\0';

    return reversed_string;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Correct, now I get that the size of the reverted string is 1, which doesn't make much sense. I can't find what am I doing wrong in my algorithm when reversing the string. – Hommer Smith Jan 23 '13 at 17:03
    
@HommerSmith: I'll edit. ;-) – md5 Jan 23 '13 at 17:07

You need one char more for the '\0', and also copy it at the end:

char* reverseString(char *original_string)
{
    int length = strlen(original_string);
    int top_limit = length-1;
    //char *end_of_string = original_string + top_limit;
    char *reversed_string = malloc(sizeof(char) * (1+length));

    int count = 0;

    while (count < length) {
        reversed_string[count] = original_string[top_limit];
      //reversed_string[count] = *(end_of_string--) ;
        top_limit--;
        count++;
    }
    reversed_string[count] = '\0';
    return reversed_string;
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1, but the provided source code doesn't work (see my answer). – md5 Jan 23 '13 at 17:11
    
Use of end_of_string looks wrong here. The copy loop will always read beyond the end of original_string. You could remove all use of end_of_string and just replace it with original_string – simonc Jan 23 '13 at 17:12
    
OK. I can full rewrite, but I tried to conserv the original. The point was to make place for the 0. Now is OK. – qPCR4vir Jan 23 '13 at 17:30

strlen returns size_t so you need to use a different format specifier

printf("%zu", strlen(reversed_string));

or (for strings shorter that sizeof(int) bytes) cast the length

printf("%d", (int)strlen(reversed_string));
share|improve this answer

Use %u as format specifier instead of %d

printf("%u", strlen(reversed_string));
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