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Was wondering if someone could help me out with regular expressions and bash.

I'm trying to execute a set of commands on files that only have a certain extension, in this case: mpg, mpeg, avi, and mkv.

I've actually found a solution here, however, it doesn't seem to work. If someone can tell me why, I'd appreciate it.

#!/bin/bash

# Configuration
TARGETDIR="$1"
TARGETEXT="(mpg|mpeg|avi|mkv)"

for d in `find $1 -type d`
do
    echo "Searching directory: $d"

    for f in "$d"/*
    do
            if [ -d "${f}" ];
            then
                    # File is a directory, do not perform
                    echo "$f is a directory, not performing ..."
            elif [ -f "${f}" ]; 
            then
                    filename=$(basename "$f")
                    extension="${filename##*.}"
                    if [ "$extension" == "$TARGETEXT" ];
                    then
                            echo "Match"
                    else
                            echo "Mismatch - $f - $extension"
                    fi
            fi
    done
done

Again, any assistance is appreciated.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Instead of direct string comparison

if [ "$extension" == "$TARGETEXT" ];

use Bash regex matching syntax

if [[ "$extension" =~ $TARGETEXT ]];

Note the double [[ ]] and the non-quoted $TARGETEXT.

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Ah-ha! This works brilliantly. I tried this earlier, but used quotations on $TARGETEXT. Didn't know removing it would work. Thanks a bunch. –  Battleroid Jan 23 '13 at 18:31

This can probably be done using only the find command.

find $TARGETDIR -regex ".*\\.$TARGETEXT" -type f -exec your_command {} \;
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You can do this in bash without regular expressions, just file patterns:

shopt -s globstar nullglob
for f in **/*.{mpg,mpeg,avi,mkv}; do 
    if [[ -f "$f" ]]; then
        # do something with the file:
        echo "$f"
    fi
done
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