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Guys I have one last question on my homework.. The problems asks:

Reorder the following efficiencies from smallest to largest:
2^n
n!
n^5
10,000
nlog(n)

Again.. Please DO NOT ANSWER This directly.

My Questions:

1.) What does smallest to largest mean? Least Efficient to Most Efficient?

2.) Given that 10,000 is constant, I would assume this to be my most efficient, followed by nlog(n), followed by n!, then efficient n^5, and 2^n last. Would this be correct?

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Why not send this question as an email to the professor? –  JohnnyO Jan 23 '13 at 17:28
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Because it's a timed homework assignment.. he even said don't worry about it being right or wrong, just give it your best shot, but I really want to understand the material, and I think hearing from you guys helps me learn. –  MBarnett Jan 23 '13 at 17:29
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@MBarnett is "giving it your best shot" asking it here ? To really understand the material you have to study it yourself. –  mmgp Jan 23 '13 at 17:36
    
@mmgp he doesn't like the text, so we don't use it and my math skills aren't strong enough to comprehend the google answers i'm getting.. you guys seem to be able to make it understandable so I usually look here first –  MBarnett Jan 23 '13 at 17:41
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6 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

What does smallest to largest mean? Least Efficient to Most Efficient?

I would say probably Most Efficient to Least Efficient, so O(1) -> O(n) -> O(n2) order.

Given that 10,000 is constant, I would assume this to be my most efficient, followed by nlog(n), followed by n!, then efficient n^5, and 2^n last. Would this be correct?

Just a hint here. Substitute several values of n for each of these and see which of them grows fastest. Make sure to use a fairly wide spread of values, like the first 7 or 8 powers of 10.

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Great Idea Bill!!! Thanks –  MBarnett Jan 23 '13 at 17:31
    
After taking your advice I changed the order to-- 1)10K, 2.)nlog(n) 3.) 2^n 4.) n^5 5.) n! --- does that look right? –  MBarnett Jan 23 '13 at 17:38
    
@MBarnett no, it is wrong. –  mmgp Jan 23 '13 at 17:38
    
@mmgp could you shed some light? –  MBarnett Jan 23 '13 at 17:39
    
@MBarnett You might not have used large enough values of n. Will n^5 always be greater than 2^n, or will you eventually hit an n where 2^n is greater? Same question for n!. –  Bill the Lizard Jan 23 '13 at 17:44
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For the cases of n!, n^5, and 2^n, consider how they are increased at n+1, that is, compare (n+1)! to n!, (n+1)^5 to n^5, and 2^(n+1) to 2^n.

As for your first question, interpret as you think makes the most sense and be sure to explicitly state that that is how you're ordering them (least efficient to most or the other way around) so that your professor knows what you mean.

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f(n) = O(g(n)) means that |f(n)| is always smaller than or equal to c * |g(n)| for some constant c and sufficiently large n. This means you are comparing the function values as n goes to infinity.

For example 100 * n is less than for small n but from n = 100 on is always greater than or equal to 100 n and therefore is considered "larger".

It does not work the other way round - no matter how large you choose the constant c there will always be some n0 so that for all n > n0 n² > c * 100 * n. If you for example choose c = 1,000,000 is still larger than or equal to c * 100 * n from n = 100,000,000 on.

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Try plotting them if you can. See what the graphs look like and compare them, using x instead of n.

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  1. I'd go the other way around - sort from most efficient to least efficient, but as Johnny commented - ask the professor :)
  2. The first 2 are correct - then you got is scrambled out.
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For this homework just substitute with large inputs and compare. For you to learn.. there is Big O , Omega notation & Theta Θ.

Big O is what you should get for this homework since this is upper bound which your function will never ever exceed ,.. in big values.

Omega Ω is lower bound which is what the function will never go below for small value. 1,000,000 for example.

Theta Θ is something in between.

But in real life I always faced big O notation only.

let n = 1000    
2^n =~ 1e30  
n!  =~ too BIG!  
n^5 =~ 1e15  
10,000 =~ 10000  
nlog(n) 3000  

with some sense you will find out the right order now.

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