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I'm trying to read a file from disk, separate it by line, store it into an NSArray, then loop through that array and do some pretty basic operations on the data. However, if I'm using a small-ish file (~5000 lines of data, one word per line), I end up using a few hundred megabytes of memory by the end of the loop. If I'm using a very large file (~200,000 lines), I end up using a few gigabytes of memory! Why does this happen? I should see an initial spike of memory as I load the file into the array, but then memory usage should stay fairly constant. I was using ARC, but I didn't trust it so now I'm doing all the memory management myself and I'm sure I'm releasing all temporary things I've allocated in my loop.

NSString *fileContents = [NSString stringWithContentsOfFile:path encoding:NSUTF8StringEncoding error:nil];

NSScanner *scanner = [NSScanner scannerWithString:fileContents];
NSMutableArray *wordList = [[[NSMutableArray alloc] init] autorelease];
while (![scanner isAtEnd]) {
    NSString *line = [[NSString alloc] init];
    [scanner scanUpToCharactersFromSet:[NSCharacterSet newlineCharacterSet] intoString:&line];
    [wordList addObject:line];
    [line release];
}
return wordList;
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Good, but your problem is ? –  Anoop Vaidya Jan 23 '13 at 18:15
1  
What do you expect? You can't just read in 10000 strings and expect no memory usage. Try using mmap or similar for large files like this. –  Richard J. Ross III Jan 23 '13 at 18:19
    
Post an Instruments "Object Alloc" run of your program? That should pinpoint the culprit :) –  Catfish_Man Jan 23 '13 at 18:20
2  
2-3x * 200kloc of text shouldn't be multiple gigabytes. A few hundred megs maybe. My suspicion would be that there's internal autoreleased temporary objects that could be alleviated by wrapping the inside of the loop in @autoreleasepool, but I'd like to see the profile before making suggestion. Guessing about performance is never the right answer. –  Catfish_Man Jan 23 '13 at 18:35
1  
Called it :) (see comments on accepted answer) –  Catfish_Man Jan 23 '13 at 20:57
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2 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I see two problems; you're uneccessarily creating a string, and you should hoist the creation of the character set out of your loop. The scanner is probably creating temporary objects as well; you should also add an internal autorelease pool to the loop.

NSMutableArray *wordList = [[[NSMutableArray alloc] init] autorelease];
NSCharacterSet * newline = [NSCharacterSet newlineCharacterSet];
while (![scanner isAtEnd]) {
    @autoreleasepool{
        NSString *line;
        [scanner scanUpToCharactersFromSet:newline intoString:&line];
        [wordList addObject:line];
    }
}

The string is just a plain old leak; scanUpToCharactersFromSet:intoString: doesn't ask for an allocated string, and you've lost your reference to it after that -- the release isn't targeting the same instance as the one you allocated. Richard is right, however, that the amount of memory allocated here isn't too significant.

As for the character set, the autorelease pool isn't being drained during your loop, so if newlineCharacterSet is creating and autoreleasing a new instance every time you call it, you're going to build up memory there too. I'd hope that NSCharacterSet was smart enough to cache it for you, but a note in the String Programming Guide:

  • Cache character sets (in a global dictionary, perhaps) instead of continually recreating them.

suggests that might not be the case.

The most effective one of my three suggestions, however, is likely to be the internal autorelease pool.

Finally, use ARC; it works, and it would have handled the problems with the string and the character set.

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1  
This doesn't come even close to the memory usage as the OP would suggest. The real problem here is relying on NSString and NSScanner which are notorious for using too much memory. NSScanner consistently copies the original string, using more and more memory. Use mmap for situations like this, it's not only faster but easier on the ram consumption. –  Richard J. Ross III Jan 23 '13 at 18:24
1  
@Richard Have you actually done any math for that assertion? The OP says that the small file is 5000 lines, each with one word. Assuming a generous 9 characters per word on average, there would need to be 1000 copies of the string in UTF-16 to reach 100 MB. While this is not the best method, it is not alone responsible for the usage. The only thing I can see in this which could cause this is if NSCharacterSet doesn't save the result as I had thought, since character sets are quite large, which means this answer would fix the problem. –  ughoavgfhw Jan 23 '13 at 18:37
1  
Adding an autorelease pool to the loop fixed it. It's no currently hovering at around 25MB of memory, which is acceptable. I'm threading the program, so I had an autorelease pool for the whole method with the loop in it, but after reading the docs some more, it seems like that pool wasn't getting flushed until the whole method finished (i.e. the whole loop terminated). –  strange quark Jan 23 '13 at 20:14
    
@Brian515: Right, the pool won't get drained until you exit the ending curly braces. –  Josh Caswell Jan 23 '13 at 20:48
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You have to take into account the fact that there are a lot of things going on in this piece of code.

First off because you are using NSObjects there is probably a lot of overhead, for storing stuff like the pointers to these objects, storing their functions, and virtual function tables. In addition to that you have 10,000 null-terminated strings. You also have an NSMutableArray, which depending on how it is implemented, could have up to half of its allocated space empty, to allow additional elements to be added rather them increasing the size of the NSMutableArray every time there is a new element.

If you really want to make the code more memory efficent, you might want to consider using character arrays for strings and char * arrays for storing your list of words. I also recommend following "Catfish_Man" advice about using Instruments.

Hope this helps! Good luck!

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2  
Objective-C objects don't store vtables actually. Also using C strings might not handle the data set correctly due to encoding issues. Profile first! Then consider things like this. –  Catfish_Man Jan 23 '13 at 18:46
    
Oh, sorry. Friend of mine told me it does, but checking back up on it might have been a much older version. –  Dustin F Jan 23 '13 at 18:52
1  
(To be clear: there is a vtable, but it's stored in the Class not each individual object, and is only present in some versions as an optimization. The overhead of an NSObject instance is just the pointer to the class :) ) –  Catfish_Man Jan 23 '13 at 19:08
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