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I'm using jQuery to listen to DOMSubtreeModified event, and then execute a function. What I need is a way to only run a function once per event burst. So in this case, the event will only run after 1 second, and again after 3 seconds. What is the best way to do this?

jQuery

$(function(){

	setTimeout(function(){
		$('#container')[0].innerHTML = 'test';
		$('#container')[0].innerHTML = 'test';
		$('#container')[0].innerHTML = 'test';
		$('#container')[0].innerHTML = 'test';
		$('#container')[0].innerHTML = 'test';
		$('#container')[0].innerHTML = 'test';
	},1000);

	setTimeout(function(){
		$('#container')[0].innerHTML = 'test';
		$('#container')[0].innerHTML = 'test';
		$('#container')[0].innerHTML = 'test';
		$('#container')[0].innerHTML = 'test';
		$('#container')[0].innerHTML = 'test';
		$('#container')[0].innerHTML = 'test';
	},3000);

	$('#container').bind('DOMSubtreeModified',function(){
		console.log('event');
        functionToRun();
	});

});

HTML

<div id="container"></div>


Update
The setTimeout function are there just to emulate my problem. I need a solution without changing the setTimeout code. The problem I'm having is that I get burst of DOMSubtreeModified events, and I need to get only one per burst.

share|improve this question
    
If I understand correctly, the setTimeout stuff is not what you're asking about. You want to know how to modify the element 6 times but have functionToRun run only once, is that correct? –  Crescent Fresh Sep 19 '09 at 14:32
    
yes :) –  Sindre Sorhus Sep 19 '09 at 14:37

4 Answers 4

Alternate method, which will control the rate of any function.

// Control the call rate of a function.
//  Note that this version makes no attempt to handle parameters
//  It always induces a delay, which makes the state tracking much easier.
//    This makes it only useful for small time periods, however.
//    Just clearing a flag after the timeout won't work, because we want
//    to do the the routine at least once if was called during the wait period.
throttle = function(call, timeout) {
  var my = function() {
    if (!my.handle) {
      my.handle = setTimeout(my.rightNow, timeout);
    }
  };
  my.rightNow = function() {
    if (my.handle) {
      clearTimeout(my.handle);
      my.handle = null;
    }
    call();
  };
  return my;
};
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! Using this in my Chrome Extension (github.com/yuvipanda/yenWikipedia). –  Yuvi Apr 28 '11 at 22:40
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Solved it myself.

$(function(){

	setTimeout(function(){
		$('#container')[0].innerHTML = 'test';
		$('#container')[0].innerHTML = 'test';
		$('#container')[0].innerHTML = 'test';
		$('#container')[0].innerHTML = 'test';
		$('#container')[0].innerHTML = 'test';
		$('#container')[0].innerHTML = 'test';
	},1000);

	setTimeout(function(){
		$('#container')[0].innerHTML = 'test';
		$('#container')[0].innerHTML = 'test';
		$('#container')[0].innerHTML = 'test';
		$('#container')[0].innerHTML = 'test';
		$('#container')[0].innerHTML = 'test';
		$('#container')[0].innerHTML = 'test';
	},1100);

	setTimeout(function(){
		$('#container')[0].innerHTML = 'test';
		$('#container')[0].innerHTML = 'test';
		$('#container')[0].innerHTML = 'test';
		$('#container')[0].innerHTML = 'test';
		$('#container')[0].innerHTML = 'test';
		$('#container')[0].innerHTML = 'test';
	},3000);

	addDivListener();

 });

 function addDivListener() {
    $('#container').bind('DOMSubtreeModified',function(){
    	functionToRun();
    	$(this).unbind('DOMSubtreeModified');
		setTimeout(addDivListener,10);	
    });
 }

 function functionToRun(){
    console.log('event');
 }

This prints out event 3 times in the Firebug console, and is accurate down to 100 ms.

share|improve this answer

try using one() handler

documentation

share|improve this answer
    
I'm sorry I can't elaborate and rewrite your code, I'm in Hurry. But I can do that later if you won't be able to figure it out. –  dd . Sep 19 '09 at 14:38
    
Already tried it, but it only gives me one event from the first event burst (the first timeout), and nothing on the second burst. –  Sindre Sorhus Sep 19 '09 at 14:39

This seems to be what you're looking for:

$(
  function()
  {
    setTimeout 
    (
      StartWatching,
      1000
    );
  }
);

function StartWatching()
{
  $('#container')
     .bind(
            'DOMSubtreeModified',
            function()
            {
              console.log('event');
              StopWatchingAndStartAgainLater();
            }
          );
}

function StopWatching()
{
  $('#container')
      .unbind('DOMSubtreeModified');
}

function StopWatchingAndStartAgainLater()
{
  StopWatching();
  setTimeout
  (
    StartWatching,
    3000
  );
}

This enforces the following flow:

Document.Ready
Create DOM watching event after one second
On event, turn off event and recreate it after three seconds, rinse, repeat
share|improve this answer
    
Syntax error, if I fix it, it still only prints out 1 event. –  Sindre Sorhus Sep 19 '09 at 16:04
    
@mofle...made some slight changes to how the setTimeout function is called. I'll test it locally to verify this works. –  David Andres Sep 19 '09 at 16:25
    
@mofle...confirmed that the above works when I change StartWatching to simple append to a div and make a call to StopWatchingAndStartAgainLater. If this still fails for you, chances are then that something is not working with the bind to the DOMSubtreeModified event. –  David Andres Sep 19 '09 at 16:30
    
@mofle....and verified it works with DOMSubtreeModified in FireFox 3.5 and Google Chrome, at least. This event does not appear to fire in IE 7.0. –  David Andres Sep 19 '09 at 16:37

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