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int sum = 0; 
for (int n = N; n > 0; n /= 2)
   for (int i = 0; i < n; i++)
      sum++; 

I was pretty sure it grows in nlogn but was told it's linear... Why is it linear and not linearithmic?

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5  
"linearithmic"? Do you mean "logarithmic"? –  duffymo Jan 23 '13 at 18:20
4  
@duffymo: linearithmic –  n1xx1 Jan 23 '13 at 18:21
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Never heard that term before. I might call it log-linear. I'll Google your term. –  duffymo Jan 23 '13 at 18:22
    
log linear already has a different meaning. –  airza Jan 23 '13 at 18:41
    
First time I've heard it: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Time_complexity –  duffymo Jan 23 '13 at 19:04
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3 Answers 3

up vote 15 down vote accepted

It is linear. Imagine for a second n is 64. The inner loop runs 64 times, then 32 times, then 16 times, then 8 times, then 4 times, then 2 times, then 1 time. 64 + 32 + 16 + 8 + 4 + 2 + 1 = 127.

So it requires 2n-1 total operations (for a power of 2, but that doesn't change the analysis), assuming the inner loop is not optimized away. That's clearly O(n) -- linear.

If the inner for loop is optimized away (to sum += n;), it's logarithmic.

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1  
I'm not sure I follow, isn't it hitting every element once on the inner loop the first time? –  BlackVegetable Jan 23 '13 at 18:24
    
@BlackVegetable: Nice catch, I'll fix that. –  David Schwartz Jan 23 '13 at 18:24
    
Thank you, it is clear now. –  TheSunken Jan 23 '13 at 18:36
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The complexity of this algorithm is Θ(N).

The number of operations is

sum{2**k} for k = 0..log2(N)

The sum of this progression is

2*N-1

which is Θ(N).

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probably k = 0..log2(N) - not that it makes a difference to the conclusion –  assylias Jan 23 '13 at 18:28
    
@assylias: Indeed, thanks. –  NPE Jan 23 '13 at 18:29
    
hmm I see. I am not quite familiar with that notation. "0..log2(N)" –  TheSunken Jan 23 '13 at 18:37
1  
@TheSunken: mathbin.net/149050 –  NPE Jan 23 '13 at 18:43
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Formally, using Sigma Notation can help you to see clearly that the order of growth is linear.

enter image description here

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