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This is absolute insanity. I was testing a post variable today that should always evaluate to a single character. Example code is...

if($_POST['status'] == '' || $_POST['status'] == 0){ die('oh no!'); }

If I pass a status of P, it was executing the die statement. I then created a PHP file with the following code...

echo 'P1: '.intval($_POST['status']=='').'<br />';
echo 'P2: '.intval($_POST['status']==0).'<br />';
echo 'P3: '.intval('P'==0).'<br />';

Guess what? P2 & P3 both evaluate to TRUE. The intval is there just to show 0 instead of nothing on P1.

Is this a known bug of PHP? Is this just something that is broken on the version I am running? Frankly, I'm at a complete loss as to why it is doing this. It evaluates correctly using triple equals, but not on double. P definitely doesn't equal 0 in my book...

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closed as too localized by dev-null-dweller, dm03514, cpilko, Peter, Jason Towne Jan 23 '13 at 21:24

This question is unlikely to help any future visitors; it is only relevant to a small geographic area, a specific moment in time, or an extraordinarily narrow situation that is not generally applicable to the worldwide audience of the internet. For help making this question more broadly applicable, visit the help center. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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P definitely doesn't equal 0 in my book change the book, for PHP one. It is known feature, not a bug. –  dev-null-dweller Jan 23 '13 at 18:37
    
Seriously? Where is that documented? Do you have a source link? –  GameCharmer Jan 23 '13 at 18:39
    
possible duplicate of php == vs === operator –  dm03514 Jan 23 '13 at 18:41
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php.net/manual/en/… –  dev-null-dweller Jan 23 '13 at 18:42
    
Thanks for the source. That makes sooo much more sense. :) –  GameCharmer Jan 23 '13 at 18:43

3 Answers 3

up vote 10 down vote accepted

From PHP documentation:

If you compare a number with a string or the comparison involves numerical strings, then each string is converted to a number and the comparison performed numerically.

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Waiting 8 more minutes and I'll accept it. Man, that just doesn't seem right, bit it looks like it is. –  GameCharmer Jan 23 '13 at 18:42
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@GameCharmer: it's the same in most other languages that are type-permissive. php tries to do its best to interpret what you want, but if you insist on doing "giraffe == plasma tv", then it's just GIGO... –  Marc B Jan 23 '13 at 18:49
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@GameCharmer It's convenient if you try to compare 3 == '3' for example, which we do very often in PHP. 'P' == 0 is counter-intuitive but follows that very same logic. –  Tchoupi Jan 23 '13 at 18:52

Read the php manual on comparison's. http://php.net/manual/en/language.operators.comparison.php

If you compare a number with a string or the comparison involves numerical strings, then each string is converted to a number and the comparison performed numerically.

If you don't want to have the conversion to happen you need to use triple equals.

$a === $b

TRUE if $a is equal to $b, and they are of the same type

Where $a == $b

TRUE if $a is equal to $b, and they are of the same type.

.

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While comparing string and number by using ==, PHP converts that string to number.

The string 'P' doesn't have any numeric character in it. Therefore, PHP evaluates it to number 0. Finally 0 == 0 happens, which is true.

On the other hand, if you use triple equals (===), that mentioned conversion doesn't happen. PHP expects their types to match as well. Because one of them is string, other is number, it returns false.

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