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I am using the mvps.org hosts file to block unwanted connections locally. The problem is that I am running nginx listening on 80, and all the blocked sites are routing through nginx to my unicorn web server and this is slowing down my web browsing immensely. Unicorn is trying to handle all these requests for unknown resources.

Can I use the hosts file to route these requests to some null path, other than 127.0.0.1?

Success: routing blocked addresses to somewhere that will not try to respond — thus improving page load speeds.

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closed as off topic by Will Feb 3 '13 at 20:56

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted
+50

You can route to any non-existent IP address in your subnet. That should also do the trick.

Or, in nginx, setup a default site for * that drops the connection (return 444) and make sure you have a server_name for your real site(s).

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This answers my question, however! Routing these hosts to a different IP is still slow because it will never respond. Opening the net panel in firebug when connecting to a site with advertisements on it shows a spinning ball forever as it tries to reach this unreachable ip. Is there somewhere i can route it to that will just shut it down immediately? –  Mike Feb 1 '13 at 18:35
    
I managed to config nginx to immediately return 404 not found. –  Mike Feb 1 '13 at 18:41
    
Cool. I didn't test the first one, but it makes sense theoretically. I would think the browser would give up pretty quickly, guess not. Also, returning 444 would be just slightly faster because it drops the request without responding. –  brad Feb 2 '13 at 3:56
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Blocking abusive clients is quite easy with NGinx. Ideally you'd want to tarpit the requests (i.e., hold the connection open for a long time to slow down the abusive client), but NGinx doesn't seem to do this. What you want is the deny config option. If you want to do it globally, you can just add denies to the http block. Something like this:

http {
  ...
  deny 1.2.3.4;
  deny 5.6.7.8;
  ...
}

This might be a little cumbersome if you have a lot of addresses to block. One option is to build the list in a separate file and then include it in your main conf. So, you might have /etc/nginx/blocks.conf which looks like this:

deny 1.2.3.4;
deny 5.6.7.8;
...

This could be generated easily with a script. Then, you can just include that into your main conf like so:

http {
  ...
  include blocks.conf;
  ...
}

This way the requests won't make it through to your unicorn.

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