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Is there any specific reason for not having std::copy_if algorithm in C++ ? I know I can use std::remove_copy_if to achieve the required behavior. I think it is coming in C++0x, but a simple copy_if which takes a range, a output iterator and a functor would have been nice. Was it just simply missed out or is there some other reason behind it?

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+1 I never thought of it. –  AraK Sep 19 '09 at 15:57
3  
It will be added to the next standard. The current draft has it under chapter 25.2.1 in the algorithms library. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Sep 19 '09 at 16:54
    
Duplicate: stackoverflow.com/questions/794320/… –  j_random_hacker Sep 20 '09 at 16:52

5 Answers 5

up vote 38 down vote accepted

According to Stroustrup's "The C++ Programming Language" it was just an over-sight.

(as a citation, the same question answered in boost mail-lists: copy_if)

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6  
As an update, the C++11 standard has corrected this oversight by adding a new copy_if algorithm: en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/algorithm/copy –  Bret Kuhns Sep 23 '12 at 16:46

Stroustrup says they forgot it.

However, you can use remove_copy_if (which really should be called copy_if_not) along with not1 instead.

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5  
In my mind I always translate "remove_copy_if" to "copy_except" :) –  StackedCrooked Apr 28 '11 at 22:03
1  
...as long as you're willing to accept that std::not1 is not compatible with a function pointer. (As I see has been discussed below...) –  Michael Cornelius Feb 18 '13 at 20:32

Multiple sources indicate that it was left out of STL by accident.

However, I am not sure if that's a fact or a self-perpetuating myth. I'd appreciate if anyone would point out a source more credible than a link to a random post on the Internet.

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3  
Here's a non-random post on the internet, selected on the basis that it claims to be an email from Stroustrup to the Boost mailing list: lists.boost.org/Archives/boost/2001/01/8030.php. Of course it could be a fraud, or it could be that Stroustrup himself has bought the myth. I guess it's possible that Stepanov generally thought it best to have remove_copy_if, and deliberately excluded copy_if as redundant. But seriously, it's clearly some kind of mistake to have remove_copy_if but not copy_if, if only one of taste :-) –  Steve Jessop Apr 17 '10 at 2:45

It's dead easy to write your own:

template <class InputIterator, class OutputIterator, class Predicate>
OutputIterator copy_if(InputIterator first, InputIterator last,
                       OutputIterator result, Predicate pred)
{
  return std::remove_copy_if(first,last,result,std::not1(pred));
}

Edit: This version works with all predicates:

template <class InputIterator, class OutputIterator, class Predicate>
OutputIterator copy_if(InputIterator first, InputIterator last,
                       OutputIterator result, Predicate pred)
{
  while(first!=last)
  {
    if(pred(*first))
        *result++ = *first;
    ++first;
  }
  return result;
}
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2  
This isn't actually correct, as noted in Effective STL item 36, because it only works on adaptable functors. –  rlbond Sep 19 '09 at 18:00
    
looks like it's not that dead easy, it seems that your second attempt returns the first value matching the predicate - besides, IMHO, you're a little off-topic here –  rotoglup Sep 26 '09 at 10:08
4  
Don't you have to iterate the OutputIterator? *(result++) = *first; –  Peter Kovacs Jan 26 '10 at 2:03
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-1: If result is an OutputIterator then why do you assign *first to it? Your code is wrong and @Peter Kovacs is correct. –  Troubadour Apr 28 '11 at 22:28
3  
@Peter & Troubadour - of course you are both correct. Mea culpa. The code I wrote did actually work, but presumably that was only because of some crazy intersection between the implementation details and my test code. I have corrected it and +1'd you. –  alex tingle May 3 '11 at 19:53

Just for completeness, in case someone googles his/her way to this question, it should be mentioned that now (post C++11) there is a copy if algorithm. It behaves as expected (copies the elements in a range, for which some predicate returns true, to another range).

A typical use case would be

std::vector<int> foo{ 25, 15, 5, -5, -15 };
std::vector<int> bar;

// copy only positive numbers:
auto it = std::copy_if (foo.begin(), foo.end(), std::back_inserter(bar), 
            [](int i){return !(i<0);
          });
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