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Comparing reading files using the following three techniques:

  1. C <stdio.h> FILE*
  2. Win32 CreateFile()/ReadFile()
  3. Win32 memory mapping

I noted that #1 is faster than #2, and #3 is the fastest.

e.g. Sorted from the fastest to the slowest, for processing a 900MB test file, I got these results:

Win32 memory mapping: 821.308 ms

C file (FILE*): 1779.83 ms

Win32 file (CreateFile): 3649.67 ms

Why is the C <stdio.h> technique faster than Win32 ReadFile() access? I'd expect raw Win32 APIs to have less overhead than CRT. What am I missing here?

Compilable test C++ source code follows.

////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
// Test file reading using C FILE*, Win32 CreateFile and Win32 memory mapping.
////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////


#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <algorithm>
#include <exception>
#include <iostream>
#include <stdexcept>
#include <Windows.h>


//------------------------------------------------------------------------
//                      Performance (speed) measurement
//------------------------------------------------------------------------

long long counter() 
{
    LARGE_INTEGER li;
    QueryPerformanceCounter(&li);
    return li.QuadPart;
}

long long frequency() 
{
    LARGE_INTEGER li;
    QueryPerformanceFrequency(&li);
    return li.QuadPart;
}

void print_time(const long long start, const long long finish, 
                const char * const s) 
{
    std::cout << s << ": " << (finish - start) * 1000.0 / frequency() << " ms\n";
}


//------------------------------------------------------------------------
//                      RAII handle wrappers
//------------------------------------------------------------------------

struct c_file_traits
{
    typedef FILE* type;

    static FILE* invalid_value()
    {
        return nullptr;
    }

    static void close(FILE* f)
    {
        fclose(f);
    }
};

struct win32_file_traits
{
    typedef HANDLE type;

    static HANDLE invalid_value()
    {
        return INVALID_HANDLE_VALUE;
    }

    static void close(HANDLE h)
    {
        CloseHandle(h);
    }
};

struct win32_handle_traits
{
    typedef HANDLE type;

    static HANDLE invalid_value()
    {
        return nullptr;
    }

    static void close(HANDLE h)
    {
        CloseHandle(h);
    }
};

template <typename Traits>
class handle
{
public:
    typedef typename Traits::type type;

    handle()
        : _h( Traits::invalid_value() )
    {
    }

    explicit handle(type h)
        : _h(h)
    {
    }

    ~handle()
    {
        close();
    }

    bool valid() const
    {
        return (_h != Traits::invalid_value());
    }

    type get() const
    {
        return _h;
    }

    void close()
    {
        if (valid())
            Traits::close(_h);

        _h = Traits::invalid_value();
    }

    void reset(type h)
    {
        if (h != _h)
        {
            close();
            _h = h;
        }
    }


private: // Ban copy
    handle(const handle&);
    handle& operator=(const handle&);

private:
    type _h;    // wrapped raw handle
};

typedef handle<c_file_traits> c_file_handle;
typedef handle<win32_file_traits> win32_file_handle;
typedef handle<win32_handle_traits> win32_handle;


//------------------------------------------------------------------------
//              File reading tests using various techniques
//------------------------------------------------------------------------

unsigned long long count_char_using_c_file(const std::string& filename, const char ch)
{
    unsigned long long char_count = 0;

#pragma warning(push)
#pragma warning(disable: 4996) // fopen use is OK
    c_file_handle file( fopen(filename.c_str(), "rb") );
#pragma warning(pop)

    if (! file.valid())
        throw std::runtime_error("Can't open file.");

    char read_buffer[1024]; // 1 KB
    bool has_more_data = true;
    while (has_more_data)
    {
        size_t read_count = fread(read_buffer, 1, sizeof(read_buffer), file.get());
        for (size_t i = 0; i < read_count; i++)
        {
            if ( read_buffer[i] == ch )
                char_count++;
        }

        if (read_count < sizeof(read_buffer))
            has_more_data = false;
    }

    return char_count;
}


unsigned long long count_char_using_win32_file(const std::string& filename, const char ch)
{
    unsigned long long char_count = 0;

    win32_file_handle file( ::CreateFileA(
        filename.c_str(),
        GENERIC_READ,
        FILE_SHARE_READ,
        nullptr,
        OPEN_EXISTING,
        FILE_FLAG_SEQUENTIAL_SCAN,
        nullptr
        ) 
    );
    if (! file.valid())
        throw std::runtime_error("Can't open file.");

    char read_buffer[1024]; // 1 KB
    bool has_more_data = true;
    while (has_more_data)
    {
        DWORD read_count = 0;
        if ( ! ReadFile(file.get(), read_buffer, sizeof(read_buffer), &read_count, nullptr) )
            throw std::runtime_error("File read error using ReadFile().");

        for (size_t i = 0; i < read_count; i++)
        {
            if ( read_buffer[i] == ch )
                char_count++;
        }

        if (read_count < sizeof(read_buffer))
            has_more_data = false;
    }

    return char_count;
}


// Memory-map a file.
class file_map
{
public:
    explicit file_map(const std::string& filename)
        : _view(nullptr), _length(0)
    {
        _file.reset( ::CreateFileA(
            filename.c_str(), 
            GENERIC_READ, 
            FILE_SHARE_READ,
            nullptr, 
            OPEN_EXISTING, 
            FILE_ATTRIBUTE_NORMAL, 
            nullptr) );
        if (! _file.valid())
            return;

        LARGE_INTEGER file_size;
        if ( ! GetFileSizeEx(_file.get(), &file_size))
            return;

        if (file_size.QuadPart == 0)
            return;

        _mapping.reset( ::CreateFileMapping(
            _file.get(), nullptr, 
            PAGE_READONLY, 
            0, 
            0, 
            nullptr)
        );
        if (! _mapping.valid())
            return;

        _view = reinterpret_cast<char*>
            (::MapViewOfFile(_mapping.get(), FILE_MAP_READ, 0, 0, 0));
        if (! _view)
            return;

        _length = file_size.QuadPart;
    }

    ~file_map()
    {
        if (_view)
            UnmapViewOfFile(_view);
    }

    bool valid() const
    {
        return (_view != nullptr);
    }

    const char * begin() const
    {
        return _view;
    }

    const char * end() const
    {
        return begin() + length();
    }

    unsigned long long length() const
    {
        return _length;
    }

private:    // ban copy
    file_map(const file_map&);
    file_map& operator=(const file_map&);

private:
    win32_file_handle   _file;
    win32_handle        _mapping;
    char*               _view;
    unsigned long long  _length;    // in bytes
};


unsigned long long count_char_using_memory_mapping(const std::string& filename, const char ch)
{
    unsigned long long char_count = 0;

    file_map view(filename);
    if (! view.valid())
        throw std::runtime_error("Can't create memory-mapping of file.");

    for (auto it = view.begin(); it != view.end(); ++it)
    {
        if ( *it == ch )
        {
            char_count++;
        }
    }

    return char_count;
}


template <typename TestFunc>
void run_test(const char * message, TestFunc test, const std::string& filename, const char ch)
{
    const long long start = counter();
    const unsigned long long char_count = test(filename, ch);
    const long long finish = counter();
    print_time(start, finish, message);
    std::cout << "Count of \'" << ch << "\' : " << char_count << "\n\n";
}


int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
    static const int kExitOk = 0;
    static const int kExitError = 1;

    if (argc != 3)
    {
        std::cerr << argv[0] << " <char> <filename>.\n";
        std::cerr << "Counts occurrences of ASCII character <char>\n";
        std::cerr << "in the <filename> file.\n\n";
        return kExitError;
    }

    const char ch = *(argv[1]);
    const std::string filename = argv[2];

    try
    {
        run_test("C <stdio.h> file (FILE*)", count_char_using_c_file, filename, ch);
        run_test("Win32 file (CreateFile)", count_char_using_win32_file, filename, ch);           
        run_test("Win32 memory mapping", count_char_using_memory_mapping, filename, ch);

        return kExitOk;
    }
    catch(const std::exception& e)
    {
        std::cerr << "\n*** ERROR: " << e.what() << '\n';
        return kExitError;
    }
}

////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
share|improve this question
8  
To reduce syscall overhead, the FILE implementation is doing its own buffering. Nothing too magical about it. –  Cory Nelson Jan 23 '13 at 19:56
6  
As a quick note: If you perform back-to-back tests on the SAME file, the second test result will be skewed by file data/metadata caching. Windows caches file data as does the disk controller hardware. I could not tell from a quick read of the code whether the above statment applies, but it most often is the cause of things like this. –  jim mcnamara Jan 23 '13 at 19:59
1  
What happens if you increase the buffer size in count_char_using_win32_file()? –  NPE Jan 23 '13 at 20:00
1  
On my computer, fopen is the slowest after setting read buffer according to the claster size (4096) –  Lol4t0 Jan 23 '13 at 20:12
    
@mr-c64 I remember reading another question on stackoverflow asking why fread is faster than ReadFile, it's stackoverflow.com/questions/14290337/…. The guy was reading it byte-by-byte, so of course fread was faster with its own buffering. –  sashoalm Jan 23 '13 at 20:34

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Just ran some tests on my machine that shows that increasing the buffer size actually increases performance:

C <stdio.h> file (FILE*): 1431.93 ms
Bufsize: 0
Count of 'x' : 3161882

Win32 file (CreateFile): 2289.45 ms
Bufsize: 1024
Count of 'x' : 3161882

Win32 file (CreateFile): 1714.5 ms
Bufsize: 2048
Count of 'x' : 3161882

Win32 file (CreateFile): 1479.16 ms
Bufsize: 4096
Count of 'x' : 3161882

Win32 file (CreateFile): 1328.25 ms
Bufsize: 8192
Count of 'x' : 3161882

Win32 file (CreateFile): 1256.1 ms
Bufsize: 16384
Count of 'x' : 3161882

Win32 file (CreateFile): 1223.54 ms
Bufsize: 32768
Count of 'x' : 3161882

Win32 file (CreateFile): 1224.84 ms
Bufsize: 65536
Count of 'x' : 3161882

Win32 file (CreateFile): 1212.4 ms
Bufsize: 131072
Count of 'x' : 3161882

Win32 file (CreateFile): 1238.09 ms
Bufsize: 262144
Count of 'x' : 3161882

Win32 file (CreateFile): 1209.2 ms
Bufsize: 524288
Count of 'x' : 3161882

Win32 file (CreateFile): 1223.67 ms
Bufsize: 1048576
Count of 'x' : 3161882

Win32 file (CreateFile): 1349.98 ms
Bufsize: 2097152
Count of 'x' : 3161882

Win32 memory mapping: 796.281 ms
Bufsize: 0
Count of 'x' : 3161882

Some steps in the Visual Studio 2012 debugger reveals that the buffer size of the FILE* method is 4096 bytes, at least on my machine. (And as others have already said it calls ReadFile too unless you are reading from a console.)

It is also interesting that big buffers marginally slow down the performance. Moving the new operator outside the test doesn't solve the issue either.

First the memory-mapped test was pretty slow for me because I ran it in Debug mode. I've updated all the results with the Release mode compilation. Memory mapping became the first.

share|improve this answer
2  
The slow memory mapping is from running it in Debug mode from Visual Studio. Build in Release mode. –  paddy Jan 24 '13 at 1:29
    
@paddy: Of course I'm assuming we are running the tests built in Release mode... –  Mr.C64 Jan 24 '13 at 1:44
    
Yeah I realised that. I just noticed that if I build your program in Debug mode, I see the slow memory mapping on the same order as described in this answer. –  paddy Jan 24 '13 at 1:51
    
I tried increasing buffer size for both the Win32 CreateFile()/ReadFile() technique and the C FILE* <stdio.h> technique, and with 16KB buffers they are almost equivalent (memory mapping is still #1). –  Mr.C64 Jan 24 '13 at 18:36
    
@paddy Yes, the results came really from a Debug build, updated. –  Csq Jan 24 '13 at 19:46

The fastest disk access I've ever attained was using ReadFile. But I specifically opened the file with flags to meet my disk access and caching requirements. If you just use it verbatim, the comparison is a little bit lame.

You should read up more on the function, as well as CreateFile. You'll find you can read data in (multiples of) sector-sized blocks to sector-aligned memory. Then you'll out-perform fread.

As others have said, fread is doing its own buffering. Your buffering implementation with ReadFile still needs work.

Check out MSDN. ALl the information is there. Specifically, here:

share|improve this answer

Are you sure you are testing properly?
How are you accounting for disk position, seek time, file cacheing etc?

stdio and win32 are ultimately making the same calls to the Windows kernel to open the file.

mmap does things slightly differently, because it can reserve actually reading the data until it is used - if you have a fixed file size and performance matters, mmap is a good option

share|improve this answer

When using memory mapped file, there is no need to copy the content of the file to your application - it is mapped in as a part of the virtual memory directly from the OS, so when you access the file-content, it just needs to be read straight into a page that goes into the mapped memory.

If you do the work correctly when using the Win32 API, it should be faster the the C stdio, as there is less overhead in the call. However, it's quite possible that you aren't getting the ideal balance between system call overhead and "too large a buffer, so the read takes longer than necessary". I would suggest you try with 4K or 8K (maybe even 32K) as a buffer in your Win32 API functionality - having a buffer-size that is a multiple of 4K is ideal, since a memory page is (typically) 4KB. Fewer calls to the API makes for less overhead, but you don't want to go too far.

[I did some testing like this on Linux the other day, and found similar results - and from my experience there: use different files for each test, otherwise your filesystem caching will help the tests that run later!].

share|improve this answer

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