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I have a list of dictionaries (called "primer names") that holds the following information:

{'part number': 1, 'notes': 'Fw Gibson primer on pEM113 to extract CmR resistance and pSC101 backbone and T7 promoter and term.', 'direction': 'fw primer', 'construct': '24', 'source': 'pEM113'}
{'part number': 1, 'notes': 'Re Gibson primer on pEM113 to extract CmR resistance and pSC101 backbone and T7 promoter and term.', 'direction': 're primer', 'construct': '24', 'source': 'pEM113'}
{'part number': 2, 'notes': 'Fw Gibson primer on BBa_K274100 to extract crtEBI operon', 'direction': 'fw primer', 'construct': '24', 'source': 'BBa_K274100'}
{'part number': 2, 'notes': 'Re Gibson primer on BBa_K274100 to extract crtEBI operon', 'direction': 're primer', 'construct': '24', 'source': 'BBa_K274100'}
{'part number': 1, 'notes': 'Fw Gibson primer on pEM114 to extract CmR resistance and pSC101 backbone and K1F promoter and term.', 'direction': 'fw primer', 'construct': '25', 'source': 'pEM114'}
{'part number': 1, 'notes': 'Re Gibson primer on pEM114 to extract CmR resistance and pSC101 backbone and K1F promoter and term.', 'direction': 're primer', 'construct': '25', 'source': 'pEM114'}

I have another list of dictionaries (called "primer sequences") that holds the following information:

{'Part Number': '1', 'Construct Number': '24', 'Direction': 're primer', 'Primer Sequence': 'agaccgtcatctagtacctcTCTCCCTATAGTGAGTCGTATTACTCTAGAAGCGGCCGCg'}
{'Part Number': '1', 'Construct Number': '24', 'Direction': 'fw primer', 'Primer Sequence': 'tggaggatctgatataataaTAGCATAACCCCTTGGGGCCTCTAAACGGGTCTTGAGGGG'}
{'Part Number': '2', 'Construct Number': '24', 'Direction': 'fw primer', 'Primer Sequence': 'TACGACTCACTATAGGGAGAgaggtactagatgacggtctgcgcaaaaaaacacgttcat'}
{'Part Number': '2', 'Construct Number': '24', 'Direction': 're primer', 'Primer Sequence': 'GGCCCCAAGGGGTTATGCTAttattatatcagatcctccagcatcaaacctgctgtcgct'}
{'Part Number': '1', 'Construct Number': '25', 'Direction': 're primer', 'Primer Sequence': 'agaccgtcatctagtacctcTCTCCCTATAGTGATAGTTATTACTCTAGAAGCGGCCGCg'}
{'Part Number': '1', 'Construct Number': '25', 'Direction': 'fw primer', 'Primer Sequence': 'tggaggatctgatataataaTAGCATAACCCCTTGGGGCCTCTAAACGGGTCTTGAGGGG'}
{'Part Number': '2', 'Construct Number': '25', 'Direction': 'fw primer', 'Primer Sequence': 'TAACTATCACTATAGGGAGAgaggtactagatgacggtctgcgcaaaaaaacacgttcat'}
{'Part Number': '2', 'Construct Number': '25', 'Direction': 're primer', 'Primer Sequence': 'GGCCCCAAGGGGTTATGCTAttattatatcagatcctccagcatcaaacctgctgtcgct'}

My goal is to combine the information contained in both, such that I get an output that has part number, construct number, direction, primer sequence, notes, construct and source for each primer (fw or re) in the bottom list. In order to match "primer name" to "primer sequence", I have to check to make sure that their "part number", "construct number" and "direction" are all the same.

I've tried the following code to check this, but it doesn't seem to work:

for row in primers_names_list: #recall that primers_names_list is a list of dictionaries
    if any({x['Part Number'], x['Construct Number'], x['Direction']} == {row['part number'], row['construct number'], row['direction']} for x in primers_without_names):
        primers_with_names.append({'part number':row['part number'], 'construct number':row['construct number'], 'notes':row['notes'], 'primer sequence':x['Primer Sequence']})

Can anybody provide a hint as to how I can accomplish this please?

Thanks a lot!

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Two problems:

  1. part number is an int in primer names and a str in primer sequences. For a comparison to yield True you'd have to either convert the int to a str (using str(val)) or the str to an int (using int(val))

  2. The key names you are using in your loop are throwing KeyError exceptions, because they are incorrect (notice that primer sequences has Construct Number and primer names has construct)

Here is a working code sample:

primers_names_list = [
{'part number': 1, 'notes': 'Fw Gibson primer on pEM113 to extract CmR resistance and pSC101 backbone and T7 promoter and term.', 'direction': 'fw primer', 'construct': '24', 'source': 'pEM113'},
{'part number': 1, 'notes': 'Re Gibson primer on pEM113 to extract CmR resistance and pSC101 backbone and T7 promoter and term.', 'direction': 're primer', 'construct': '24', 'source': 'pEM113'},
{'part number': 2, 'notes': 'Fw Gibson primer on BBa_K274100 to extract crtEBI operon', 'direction': 'fw primer', 'construct': '24', 'source': 'BBa_K274100'},
{'part number': 2, 'notes': 'Re Gibson primer on BBa_K274100 to extract crtEBI operon', 'direction': 're primer', 'construct': '24', 'source': 'BBa_K274100'},
{'part number': 1, 'notes': 'Fw Gibson primer on pEM114 to extract CmR resistance and pSC101 backbone and K1F promoter and term.', 'direction': 'fw primer', 'construct': '25', 'source': 'pEM114'},
{'part number': 1, 'notes': 'Re Gibson primer on pEM114 to extract CmR resistance and pSC101 backbone and K1F promoter and term.', 'direction': 're primer', 'construct': '25', 'source': 'pEM114'},
]

primers_without_names = [
{'Part Number': '1', 'Construct Number': '24', 'Direction': 're primer', 'Primer Sequence': 'agaccgtcatctagtacctcTCTCCCTATAGTGAGTCGTATTACTCTAGAAGCGGCCGCg'},
{'Part Number': '1', 'Construct Number': '24', 'Direction': 'fw primer', 'Primer Sequence': 'tggaggatctgatataataaTAGCATAACCCCTTGGGGCCTCTAAACGGGTCTTGAGGGG'},
{'Part Number': '2', 'Construct Number': '24', 'Direction': 'fw primer', 'Primer Sequence': 'TACGACTCACTATAGGGAGAgaggtactagatgacggtctgcgcaaaaaaacacgttcat'},
{'Part Number': '2', 'Construct Number': '24', 'Direction': 're primer', 'Primer Sequence': 'GGCCCCAAGGGGTTATGCTAttattatatcagatcctccagcatcaaacctgctgtcgct'},
{'Part Number': '1', 'Construct Number': '25', 'Direction': 're primer', 'Primer Sequence': 'agaccgtcatctagtacctcTCTCCCTATAGTGATAGTTATTACTCTAGAAGCGGCCGCg'},
{'Part Number': '1', 'Construct Number': '25', 'Direction': 'fw primer', 'Primer Sequence': 'tggaggatctgatataataaTAGCATAACCCCTTGGGGCCTCTAAACGGGTCTTGAGGGG'},
{'Part Number': '2', 'Construct Number': '25', 'Direction': 'fw primer', 'Primer Sequence': 'TAACTATCACTATAGGGAGAgaggtactagatgacggtctgcgcaaaaaaacacgttcat'},
{'Part Number': '2', 'Construct Number': '25', 'Direction': 're primer', 'Primer Sequence': 'GGCCCCAAGGGGTTATGCTAttattatatcagatcctccagcatcaaacctgctgtcgct'},
]


primers_with_names = []
for row in primers_names_list: #recall that primers_names_list is a list of dictionaries
    for x in primers_without_names:
        if (
            int(x['Part Number']) == row['part number'] and
            x['Construct Number'] == row['construct'] and
            x['Direction'] == row['direction']
        ):
            primers_with_names.append(
                {
                    'part number': row['part number'], 
                    'construct number': row['construct'], 
                    'notes': row['notes'], 
                    'primer sequence':x['Primer Sequence']
                }
            )
            # If you are only expecting one match from the primers_without_names
            # collection, or wish to enforce that, you can add a break statement after
            # the insertion here to break out of the inner comparison loop and move on
            # to the next row item


for p in primers_with_names:
    print p

print
print len(primers_with_names)

Edit: Another option, if the comparison values are unique for each row in each collection, and if you have sufficient memory and don't mind pre-processing the lists, is to convert the two collections to dictionaries, keyed on a (part number, construct number, direction) tuple. This reduces the lookup effort later to amortized O(1) per row. Overall you'll get O(3N) instead of O(N^2), which is pretty good for large sets.

# convert both lists to dictionaries
primers_names_dict = { 
    (str(p['part number']), str(p['construct']), str(p['direction'])): p
    for p in primers_names_list 
}
primers_sequence_dict = {
    (str(p['Part Number']), str(p['Construct Number']), str(p['Direction'])): p
    for p in primers_without_names
}


# now that we have two dicts, we can do a key<->key match between them, so each
# comparison op is just a dictionary key lookup, which is O(1) on average
matches = []
for key in primers_names_dict.keys():
    if key in primers_sequence_dict: # amortized O(1) lookup
        matches.append( {
            'part number': primers_names_dict[key]['part number'], 
            'construct number': primers_names_dict[key]['construct'], 
            'notes': primers_names_dict[key]['notes'], 
            'primer sequence': primers_sequence_dict[key]['Primer Sequence']
        } )

for m in matches:
    print m
print len(matches)
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you Nisan! Didn't realize the small detail on data typing. –  ericmjl Jan 23 '13 at 22:02
    
Fixed the data typing issue, and it works perfectly now. I converted everything to str(...). –  ericmjl Jan 23 '13 at 22:26
    
One other problem I'm noticing is that the outer for loop only seems to run once. Do you notice that too, @Nisan.H? –  ericmjl Jan 23 '13 at 22:40
    
In the loop above, every row in primers_with_names_list is matched against every row in primers_without_names, and for every successful a match, a new row is created and saved in primers_with_names. In your original code you used any(...) as the truth condition, and the x item was simply the last row from the second collection assigned to x in the any iterator before it yielded a True, which would be the equivalent of adding break after appending to primers_with_names in the above nested for loop. –  Nisan.H Jan 23 '13 at 22:47
    
I'm not sure if your intended behaviour was to save the first valid match, or all valid matches, though. So, the above code with break after the append() step will only add the first valid match per row in the first collection (i.e. at most len(primers_names_list) matches), and without break will add all valid matches (i.e. at most len(primers_names_list)*len(primers_without_names) matches). –  Nisan.H Jan 23 '13 at 22:53

I see two problems here.

  1. Part Number in one dictionary is an integer, in the other it's a string.

  2. You put row['construct number'] where I think it should be row['construct']

Here it is fixed:

for row in primers_names_list: #recall that primers_names_list is a list of dictionaries
    for x in primers_without_names:
        if {x['Part Number'], x['Construct Number'], x['Direction']} == {str(row['part number']), row['construct'], row['direction']}:
            primers_with_names.append({'part number':row['part number'], 'construct number':row['construct'], 'notes':row['notes'], 'primer sequence':x['Primer Sequence']})
share|improve this answer
    
#1 is definitely correct; #2 - it's row['construct number']. Thank you for the comment though, @jgritty! –  ericmjl Jan 23 '13 at 22:33
    
It's definitely 'construct' though, lookie here: {'part number': 1, 'notes': 'Fw Gibson primer on pEM113 to extract CmR resistance and pSC101 backbone and T7 promoter and term.', 'direction': 'fw primer', 'construct': '24', 'source': 'pEM113'} –  jgritty Jan 23 '13 at 23:18

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