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Some foreign key's are created double in my contract table. (Article and Client). And Company is ok!

My models:

public class Contract {
    [Key]
    public int ContractID { get; set; }
    public double PricePerUnit { get; set; }
    public int Unit { get; set; }
    public int Currency { get; set; }

    [Required]
    public int ClientID { get; set; }
    public virtual Client Client { get; set; }

    [Required]
    public int CompanyID { get; set; }
    public virtual Company Company { get; set; }

    [Required]
    public int ArticleID { get; set; }
    public virtual Article Article { get; set; }

}

public class Client {
    [Key]
    public int ClientID { get; set; }
    public string Number { get; set; }
    public string FirstName { get; set; }
    public string LastName { get; set; }
    public string ZipCode { get; set; }
    public string City { get; set; }
    public string AddressLine1 { get; set; }
    public string AddressLine2 { get; set; }
    public string Memo { get; set; }
    public bool isMerchant { get; set; }

    public string Name
    {
        get
        {
            return string.Format("{0} {1}", FirstName, LastName);
        }
    }

    //[Required]
    public int? MerchantReferenceID { get; set; }
    public virtual Client MerchantReference { get; set; }
    [Required]
    public int CompanyID { get; set; }
    public virtual Company Company { get; set; }
    public virtual ICollection<Contract> Contracts { get; set; }
    public virtual ICollection<Order> Orders { get; set; }
}

public class Company
{
    [Key]
    public int CompanyID { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public int DeviceIncomingWeight { get; set; }
    public string ZipCode { get; set; }
    public string AddressLine1 { get; set; }
    public string AddressLine2 { get; set; }
    public string City { get; set; }
    public bool Admin { get; set; }
    public int UnitForMeasurements { get; set; }
    public int UnitForDisplayOnDocuments { get; set; }

    public virtual ICollection<User> Users { get; set; }
    public virtual ICollection<Category> Categories { get; set; }
    public virtual ICollection<Article> Articles { get; set; }
    public virtual ICollection<Client> Clients { get; set; }
    public virtual ICollection<Location> Locations { get; set; }
    public virtual ICollection<Contract> Contracts { get; set; }
    public virtual ICollection<IncomingMeasurement> IncomingMeasurements { get; set; }
    public virtual ICollection<Measurement> Measurements { get; set; }
    public virtual ICollection<Order> Orders { get; set; }
}

public class Article {
    [Key]
    public int ArticleID { get; set; }
    [Required]
    public string Code { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public bool TrackStock { get; set; }
    public int CurrentStock { get; set; }
    public double? Price { get; set; }

    [Required]
    public int CompanyID { get; set; }
    public virtual Company Company { get; set; }
    [Required]
    public int CategoryID { get; set; }
    public virtual Category Category { get; set; }

    public virtual ICollection<Contract> Contracts { get; set; }
    public virtual ICollection<Order> Orders { get; set; }
}

This is my OnModelCreating, where probably the fault lies:

 protected override void OnModelCreating(DbModelBuilder modelBuilder)
    {
       // modelBuilder.Entity<Contract>().HasRequired(bm => bm.Company).WithMany().WillCascadeOnDelete(false);
        modelBuilder.Entity<Contract>().HasRequired(bm => bm.Article).WithMany().WillCascadeOnDelete(false);
        modelBuilder.Entity<Contract>().HasRequired(bm => bm.Client ).WithMany().WillCascadeOnDelete(false);
        modelBuilder.Entity<Article>().HasRequired(bm => bm.Company).WithMany().WillCascadeOnDelete(false);
        modelBuilder.Entity<Measurement>().HasRequired(bm => bm.Company).WithMany().WillCascadeOnDelete(false);
        modelBuilder.Entity<Order>().HasRequired(bm => bm.Client).WithMany().WillCascadeOnDelete(false);
        modelBuilder.Entity<Order>().HasRequired(bm => bm.Article).WithMany().WillCascadeOnDelete(false);
        modelBuilder.Entity<IncomingMeasurement>().HasRequired(bm => bm.client).WithMany().WillCascadeOnDelete(false);
        modelBuilder.Entity<Client>().HasOptional(c => c.MerchantReference).WithMany().HasForeignKey(c => c.MerchantReferenceID);

        //Required fields


        base.OnModelCreating(modelBuilder);
    }

And there is something weird happening in my db (my sql server), namely this is my create table schema.

These are my fields:

CREATE TABLE [dbo].[Contracts](
[ContractID] [int] IDENTITY(1,1) NOT NULL,
[PricePerUnit] [float] NOT NULL,
[Unit] [int] NOT NULL,
[Currency] [int] NOT NULL,
[ClientID] [int] NOT NULL,
[CompanyID] [int] NOT NULL,
[ArticleID] [int] NOT NULL,
[Client_ClientID] [int] NOT NULL,
[Article_ArticleID] [int] NOT NULL,
[Client_ClientID1] [int] NULL,
[Article_ArticleID1] [int] NULL,

If you notice it, [Client_ClientID] has a duplicate: [Client_ClientID1] and also [Article_ArticleID] in [Article_ArticleID1]. But company doesn't.

Any thoughts on how to fix this?

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This happens because you include a redundant (foreign key) column in your entity classes. For example look at the category in your Contract class.

public class Contract
{
    public Int32 CategoryID { get; set; }

    public virtual Category Category { get; set; }
}

You manually specify a property and therefore column CategoryID and then the Entity Framework generates another column to hold the foreign key for the Category referenced by the property Category.

So just remove the property CategoryID and use contract.Category.CategoryID instead if you need the ID of the referenced category.

UPDATE

I was not aware of the suggestion to include a foreign key property but looking at the article linked in the comment to Jeff Siever's answer I probably spotted the answer in the section Configuring Unconventional Foreign Key Names.

The Entity Framework uses a convention to match the name of the navigation property and the foreign key property and the default convention is either NavigationPropertyNameId or NavigationPropertyName_Id while you use NavigationPropertyNameID with uppercase D.

So you have several options - change your naming to use Id, replace the convention or override the convention.

share|improve this answer
    
see my comment on the other answer :) –  NicoJuicy Jan 23 '13 at 20:52
    
I read it and I hope it helped to spot the issue - see my update. –  Daniel Brückner Jan 23 '13 at 20:58
    
Working to changes views, models, code, ... ;-) will update you soon! –  NicoJuicy Jan 23 '13 at 21:18
    
Have a followup question on : stackoverflow.com/questions/14490025/… . Because you answered my question here, there is still another property showing. (thanks for solving problem 1 ! :-) ) –  NicoJuicy Jan 23 '13 at 21:49

Eliminate the duplicate information from your model. The id's for the referenced objects aren't needed and are what is causing your problem.

public class Contract {
    [Key]
    public int ContractID { get; set; }
    public double PricePerUnit { get; set; }
    public int Unit { get; set; }
    public int Currency { get; set; }

    public virtual Client Client { get; set; }

    public virtual Company Company { get; set; }

    public virtual Article Article { get; set; }
}

And instead of the Required attribute on the id, you need to setup your entities so that the children are required.

share|improve this answer
    
I did that in the past, but all official sources say it's better to add an int as foreign key also. Eg. msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/data/hh134698.aspx . I also saw some improvements in the scaffolding which probably is a sign why it's better :) I had problems scaffolding in the Article and Client, and that's exactly where i have this problem now. I don't think this is the real solution, have done it in the past and it generates no scaffolding in controller + view, so untill proven wrong, i'm looking for a better answer. –  NicoJuicy Jan 23 '13 at 20:44
    
PS. Even Scott Hanselmans example project does it the way i do it (although i have a mistake somewhere). nerddinner.codeplex.com/SourceControl/changeset/view/… –  NicoJuicy Jan 23 '13 at 20:54
    
Just saw your OnModelCreating. Why are you specifying that the properties are required twice? You've got the required attribute on the appropriate property and you then specify HasRequired in the model creation. I believe this is causing the problem. Especially since Company is okay and the HasRequired line for Company from Contract is commented out. –  Jeff Siver Jan 23 '13 at 20:57
    
If i didn't add : .WillCascadeOnDelete(false) in my "onModelBuilder, i receive a foreign key generation error of ms sql server. But indeed, probably the fault lies there somewhere. But i still need to add the WillCascadeOnDelete(false), so my db schema creates. –  NicoJuicy Jan 23 '13 at 21:01
    
Have you tried removing the Required attribute from the model? The WithRequired in the configuration should still force the foreign key to not allow nulls. –  Jeff Siver Jan 23 '13 at 21:04

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