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just wondering if .net provides a clean way to do this:

int64 x = 1000000;
string y = null;
if (x / 1024 == 0) {
    y = x + " bytes";
}
else if (x / (1024 * 1024) == 0) {
    y = string.Format("{0:n1} KB", x / 1024f);
}

etc...

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11 Answers 11

up vote 30 down vote accepted

Here is a fairly concise way to do this:

static readonly string[] SizeSuffixes = 
                   { "bytes", "KB", "MB", "GB", "TB", "PB", "EB", "ZB", "YB" };
static string SizeSuffix(Int64 value)
{
    if (value < 0) { return "-" + SizeSuffix(-value); } 
    if (value == 0) { return "0.0 bytes"; }

    int mag = (int)Math.Log(value, 1024);
    decimal adjustedSize = (decimal)value / (1L << (mag * 10));

    return string.Format("{0:n1} {1}", adjustedSize, SizeSuffixes[mag]);
}

And here's the original implementation I suggested, which may be marginally slower, but a bit easier to follow:

static readonly string[] SizeSuffixes = 
                  { "bytes", "KB", "MB", "GB", "TB", "PB", "EB", "ZB", "YB" };

static string SizeSuffix(Int64 value)
{
    if (value < 0) { return "-" + SizeSuffix(-value); } 

    int i = 0;
    decimal dValue = (decimal)value;
    while (Math.Round(dValue / 1024) >= 1)
    {
        dValue /= 1024;
        i++;
    }

    return string.Format("{0:n1} {1}", dValue, SizeSuffixes[i]);
}

Console.WriteLine(SizeSuffix(100005000L));
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Rounding errors due to repeated integer division. –  usr Jan 23 '13 at 20:40
    
The asker is only looking for 1 decimal place of accuracy. Could you give an example of an input that produces an incorrect output? –  JLRishe Jan 23 '13 at 20:51
    
Both examples now use floating point division so there should be much less concern about rounding errors. –  JLRishe Mar 11 at 6:57
    
Thank you, just what I was looking for. (2nd implementation.) –  snapplex Apr 10 at 14:10
1  
Very neat implementation. Note that if you pass the value 0 to this function it will throw an IndexOutOfRangeException. I decided to add a if (value == 0) { return "0"; } check inside the function. –  bounav Aug 6 at 15:02

Since everyone else is posting their methods, I figured I'd post the extension method I usually use for this:

EDIT: added int/long variants...and fixed a copypasta typo...

public static class Ext
{
    private const long OneKb = 1024;
    private const long OneMb = OneKb * 1024;
    private const long OneGb = OneMb * 1024;
    private const long OneTb = OneGb * 1024;

    public static string ToPrettySize(this int value, int decimalPlaces = 0)
    {
        return ((long)value).ToPrettySize(decimalPlaces);
    }

    public static string ToPrettySize(this long value, int decimalPlaces = 0)
    {
        var asTb = Math.Round((double)value / OneTb, decimalPlaces);
        var asGb = Math.Round((double)value / OneGb, decimalPlaces);
        var asMb = Math.Round((double)value / OneMb, decimalPlaces);
        var asKb = Math.Round((double)value / OneKb, decimalPlaces);
        string chosenValue = asTb > 1 ? string.Format("{0}Tb",asTb)
            : asGb > 1 ? string.Format("{0}Gb",asGb)
            : asMb > 1 ? string.Format("{0}Mb",asMb)
            : asKb > 1 ? string.Format("{0}Kb",asKb)
            : string.Format("{0}B", Math.Round((double)value, decimalPlaces));
        return chosenValue;
    }
}
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an elegant solution, thank you! –  Amer Bakeer Nov 22 '13 at 7:28

No. Mostly because it's of a rather niche need, and there are too many possible variations. (Is it "KB", "Kb" or "Ko"? Is a megabyte 1024 * 1024 bytes, or 1024 * 1000 bytes? -- yes, some places use that!)

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1  
Mainly this - curse the hard drive manufacturers! –  JerKimball Jan 23 '13 at 20:35

Checkout the ByteSize library. It's the System.TimeSpan for bytes!

It handles the conversion and formatting for you.

var maxFileSize = ByteSize.FromKiloBytes(10);
maxFileSize.Bytes;
maxFileSize.MegaBytes;
maxFileSize.GigaBytes;

It also does string representation and parsing.

// ToString
ByteSize.FromKiloBytes(1024).ToString(); // 1 MB
ByteSize.FromGigabytes(.5).ToString();   // 512 MB
ByteSize.FromGigabytes(1024).ToString(); // 1 TB

// Parsing
ByteSize.Parse("5b");
ByteSize.Parse("1.55B");
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No.

But you can implement like this;

    static double ConvertBytesToMegabytes(long bytes)
    {
    return (bytes / 1024f) / 1024f;
    }

    static double ConvertKilobytesToMegabytes(long kilobytes)
    {
    return kilobytes / 1024f;
    }

Also check out How to correctly convert filesize in bytes into mega or gigabytes?

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Here is an option that's easier to extend than yours, but no, there is none built into the library itself.

private static List<string> suffixes = new List<string> { " B", " KB", " MB", " GB", " TB", " PB" };
public static string Foo(int number)
{
    for (int i = 0; i < suffixes.Count; i++)
    {
        int temp = number / (int)Math.Pow(1024, i + 1);
        if (temp == 0)
            return (number / (int)Math.Pow(1024, i)) + suffixes[i];
    }
    return number.ToString();
}
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The short version of the most voted answer has problems with TB values.

I adjusted it appropriately to handle also tb values and still without a loop and also added a little error checking for negative values. Here's my solution:

static readonly string[] SizeSuffixes = { "bytes", "KB", "MB", "GB", "TB", "PB", "EB", "ZB", "YB" };
static string SizeSuffix(long value, int decimalPlaces = 0)
{
    if (value < 0)
    {
        throw new ArgumentException("Bytes should not be negative", "value");
    }
    var mag = (int)Math.Max(0, Math.Log(value, 1024));
    var adjustedSize = Math.Round(value / Math.Pow(1024, mag), decimalPlaces);
    return String.Format("{0} {1}", adjustedSize, SizeSuffixes[mag]);
}
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The stated issue with large values should no longer be present in the accepted answer. –  JLRishe Jan 31 at 14:55

I have combined some of the answers here into two methods that work great. The second method below will convert from a bytes string (like 1.5.1 GB) back to bytes (like 1621350140) as a long type value. I hope this is useful to others looking for a solution to convert bytes to a string and back into bytes.

public static string BytesAsString(float bytes)
{
    string[] suffix = { "B", "KB", "MB", "GB", "TB" };
    int i;
    double doubleBytes = 0;

    for (i = 0; (int)(bytes / 1024) > 0; i++, bytes /= 1024)
    {
        doubleBytes = bytes / 1024.0;
    }

    return string.Format("{0:0.00} {1}", doubleBytes, suffix[i]);
}

public static long StringAsBytes(string bytesString)
{
    if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(bytesString))
    {
        return 0;
    }

    const long OneKb = 1024;
    const long OneMb = OneKb * 1024;
    const long OneGb = OneMb * 1024;
    const long OneTb = OneGb * 1024;
    double returnValue;
    string suffix = string.Empty;

    if (bytesString.IndexOf(" ") > 0)
    {
        returnValue = float.Parse(bytesString.Substring(0, bytesString.IndexOf(" ")));
        suffix = bytesString.Substring(bytesString.IndexOf(" ") + 1).ToUpperInvariant();
    }
    else
    {
        returnValue = float.Parse(bytesString.Substring(0, bytesString.Length - 2));
        suffix = bytesString.ToUpperInvariant().Substring(bytesString.Length - 2);
    }

    switch (suffix)
    {
        case "KB":
            {
                returnValue *= OneKb;
                break;
            }

        case "MB":
            {
                returnValue *= OneMb;
                break;
            }

        case "GB":
            {
                returnValue *= OneGb;
                break;
            }

        case "TB":
            {
                returnValue *= OneTb;
                break;
            }

        default:
            {
                break;
            }
    }

    return Convert.ToInt64(returnValue);
}
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I would solve it using Extension methods, Math.Pow function and Enums:

public static class MyExtension
{
    public enum SizeUnits
    {
        Byte, KB, MB, GB, TB, PB, EB, ZB, YB
    }

    public static string ToSize(this Int64 value, SizeUnits unit)
    {
        return (value / (double)Math.Pow(1024, (Int64)unit)).ToString("0.00");
    }
}

and use it like:

string h = x.ToSize(MyExtension.SizeUnits.KB);
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How about:

public void printMB(uint sizekB)   
{
    double sizeMB = (double) sizekB / 1024;
    Console.WriteLine("Size is " + sizeMB.ToString("0.00") + "MB");
}

E.g. call like

printMB(123456);

Will result in output

"Size is 120,56 MB"
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    private string GetFileSize(double byteCount)
    {
        string size = "0 Bytes";
        if (byteCount >= 1073741824.0)
            size = String.Format("{0:##.##}", byteCount / 1073741824.0) + " GB";
        else if (byteCount >= 1048576.0)
            size = String.Format("{0:##.##}", byteCount / 1048576.0) + " MB";
        else if (byteCount >= 1024.0)
            size = String.Format("{0:##.##}", byteCount / 1024.0) + " KB";
        else if (byteCount > 0 && byteCount < 1024.0)
            size = byteCount.ToString() + " Bytes";

        return size;
    }

    private void btnBrowse_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        if (openFile1.ShowDialog() == DialogResult.OK)
        {
            FileInfo thisFile = new FileInfo(openFile1.FileName);

            string info = "";

            info += "File: " + Path.GetFileName(openFile1.FileName);
            info += Environment.NewLine;
            info += "File Size: " + GetFileSize((int)thisFile.Length);

            label1.Text = info;
        }
    }

This is one way to do it aswell (The number 1073741824.0 is from 1024*1024*1024 aka GB)

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