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Edit Some have expressed their dislike for my particular solution presented in this problem, but please don't waste my time suggesting completely alternative methods. I have no control over the requirements of what I am working on. If you disagree with it and don't have an answer, just move along. Thanks.

For starters, this is a practice project and will not be used by the general public. I need to secure some pages in my website using session properties for username. This occurs (the username saved into session) when a correct username and password combo is entered. My boss reviewed my implementation and said that "storing the username value into the HttpSessionState directly is wrong, you should set the username property of the session, and store the session object into the HttpSessionState". Now I think I understand what parts of my code he is referring to, but changing this breaks the security (anyone can use a direct link to a page once a single user has logged in).

Make sure to read the comments in code, I added them to describe the lines in question.

What worked in terms of security, but username is stored directly into HttpSessionState:

//login.ascx.cs
private void Login_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
   if (sender == null || e == null)
   {
      throw new ArgumentNullException("Null Exception: Login_Click");
   }

   User user = new User();            
   user.Login(_username.Text, _password.Text);           

   if (user.IsValid() && user.GetIsUser() != false)
   {
      user.Save();
      //the line below is what I used to make the secure pages work properly.
      //but based on what my boss says, I think this is what should be changed.
      Session["Username"] = _username.Text;
      //What i tried instead was to set 'MySession.Current.Username = _username.Text;'
      //which allowed successful login, but the pages became insecure once again.
      Response.Redirect("Secure/Default.aspx");
   }
   else
   {
      DisplayErrors(user._validationErrors);
   }
   _errors.Text = errorMessage;    
}       

and MySession.cs

public string Username
{
   get
   {
      if (HttpContext.Current.Session["Username"] == null)
      {
         return string.Empty;
      }
      else
      {
         return HttpContext.Current.Session["Username"].ToString();
      }
   }
   set
   {
      //when the line below is uncommented, the secure pages are vulnerable
      //but if I comment it out, they work properly.
      //HttpContext.Current.Session["Username"] = value;
   }
}

So how can I Set the username property of the session, and store the session object into the HttpSessionState while still maintaining a secure site?

EDIT: @Win, within Secure/Default.aspx.cs

private void Page_load(object sender, System.EventArgs e)
{
   ...
   if((string)Session["Username"] != _labelusername.Text)
   {
      Response.Redirect(redirectLogin); //to login page
   } 
   else {} //success
}
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1  
Use membership, not session, for authentication. –  Craig Stuntz Jan 23 '13 at 20:38
2  
I thought my first line made it clear, this is a project for training and doing this is not part of the project, and doing so would be a negative. It is very likely I may do it your way in the future. –  Nibirue Jan 23 '13 at 20:40
    
I understand that, but membership is really easy to use, and I can't understand why you would "train" by doing something incorrectly. Session cannot be used to store security-sensitive information, ever. It's a user-specific cache, nothing more. Never use it for any kind of authentication or security! –  Craig Stuntz Jan 23 '13 at 20:42
    
MySession.Current.Username = _username.Text; is valid as long as it is a static class. How do you security in Secure/Default.aspx? Please post the security checking code of that page. –  Win Jan 23 '13 at 21:55
    
Alright Win, I edited the OP with this info you requested. –  Nibirue Jan 23 '13 at 22:08
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2 Answers

You should look into FormsAuthentication. There are many examples online like this one:

http://bradkingsley.com/securing-asp-net-pages-forms-authentication-c-and-net-4/

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Maybe your boss wants you to create container class:

public class SessionContainer
{
  public string Username { get; set; }
}

And instead of

Session["Username"] = _username.Text;

put username into container and container into session

SessionContainer sc = new SessionContainer(){ Username = _username.Text }

Session["SessionContainer"] = sc;

you can access it by casting

SessionContainer sc = (SessionContainer)Session["SessionContainer"];

Its better than puting username directly because you can implement some encryption in SessionContainer

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