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I need to copy FAST a portion of an array into another, replacing it's old values.

  • No range checkings needed.
  • Number of items to copy: 16384
  • The array only contains integers

benchmark code: http://codebase.es/test/copytest.htm

This is my approach:

  var i = 0x4000>>5; // loops count
  var j = 0x4000;    // write start index
  var k = 0x8000;    // read start index
  while (i--) {      // loop unrolling
    dst[j++]=src[k++]; dst[j++]=src[k++];
    dst[j++]=src[k++]; dst[j++]=src[k++];    
    dst[j++]=src[k++]; dst[j++]=src[k++];
    dst[j++]=src[k++]; dst[j++]=src[k++];
    //8
    dst[j++]=src[k++]; dst[j++]=src[k++];
    dst[j++]=src[k++]; dst[j++]=src[k++];    
    dst[j++]=src[k++]; dst[j++]=src[k++];
    dst[j++]=src[k++]; dst[j++]=src[k++];
    //16
    dst[j++]=src[k++]; dst[j++]=src[k++];
    dst[j++]=src[k++]; dst[j++]=src[k++];    
    dst[j++]=src[k++]; dst[j++]=src[k++];
    dst[j++]=src[k++]; dst[j++]=src[k++];
    //24
    dst[j++]=src[k++]; dst[j++]=src[k++];
    dst[j++]=src[k++]; dst[j++]=src[k++];    
    dst[j++]=src[k++]; dst[j++]=src[k++];
    dst[j++]=src[k++]; dst[j++]=src[k++];
    //32
  }

can this be done faster?

share|improve this question
3  
A slight performance gain could be to use pre-decremet/pre-increment instead of post-decrement/post-increment. –  Gumbo Sep 19 '09 at 17:41
    
Gumbo, you're right. It's a little faster. If you write your comment as an answer and there's no best solution i'll give it to you –  Peter Sep 19 '09 at 18:01
    
I know this is very late but was curious. Why not just var dst = src.concat() ? I think this is probably the fastest way to clone an array. This isn't deep copy though. For deep copy looping is the only way to go. –  Shripad Krishna Nov 27 '11 at 23:19

7 Answers 7

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You could keep unrolling the loop for even slighter increases in performance, but it seems like this is just about as fast as you're going to get it. As Gumbo stated in a comment, try using pre-increment instead of post-increment:

var i = 0x4000>>5 + 1; // loops count
var j = 0x4000 - 1;    // write start index
var k = 0x8000 - 1;    // read start index
while (--i) {      // loop unrolling
    dst[++j]=src[++k]; dst[++j]=src[++k];
    dst[++j]=src[++k]; dst[++j]=src[++k];    
    dst[++j]=src[++k]; dst[++j]=src[++k];
    dst[++j]=src[++k]; dst[++j]=src[++k];
    //8
    ...
share|improve this answer
    
Why not for i-- too? –  Gumbo Sep 19 '09 at 17:54
    
Right, missed that –  Carson Myers Sep 19 '09 at 18:07

Im not sure your method is faster than this:

var i = 0x4000;     // loops count
var j = 0x4000;    // write start index
var k = 0x8000;    // read start index
while (i--) {      // loop unrolling
  dst[j++]=src[k++];
}
share|improve this answer
    
It is (tested in chrome, FF3.5 and Opera) Have a look at: codebase.es/test/copytest.htm –  Peter Sep 19 '09 at 17:23

Sorry, one year later, but.. this is fastest in FF:

function copy4() {
  var i = 0x4000; // loops count
  var j = 0x4000; // write start index
  var k = 0x8000; // read start index

  var args = src.slice(k, k+i);
  args.unshift(i);
  args.unshift(j);
  Array.prototype.splice.apply(dst,args);
}
share|improve this answer

I would consider the slice method:

var dst = src.slice(start,end)

The performance depends on the implementation of javascript engine, but presumably all the browsers have implemented as efficient as possible on their platform.

See more here

share|improve this answer
    
He asks to replace contents of another array, not to form a new one. –  Cem Kalyoncu Sep 19 '09 at 17:09
    
@cemkalyoncu: Then do slice and splice. –  Gumbo Sep 19 '09 at 17:18
4  
"Slice and splice" sounds like a TV direct-response product. "Tired of writing clumsy for loops? Try new Slice and Splice! It slices, it splices, it takes the pain out of array processing. Order now for only $19.95!" –  Matthew Crumley Sep 19 '09 at 17:35
    
slice + splice is much slower. Look at copy 3: codebase.es/test/copytest.htm –  Peter Sep 19 '09 at 17:36

An alternative worth benchmarking may be building a brand new dst array with just a few powerful primitives rather than performing the loop, i.e.:

dst = dst.slice(0, writestart).concat(
    src.slice(readstart, readstart+count),
    dst.slice(writestart+count));

How the performance of this approach compares to looping will no doubt vary with the array lengths and counts involved, as well as with the underlying Javascript engine -- guessing would not be very productive, which is why I suggest benchmarking instead;-).

share|improve this answer
    
this is around 10 times slower –  Peter Sep 19 '09 at 17:34
    
Some internal functions which most probably written in C++ works slower than interpreting bunch of lines, strange. BTW I tested same code in C resulting 6-14ms of copy time (1000 x 0x4000 elements) –  Cem Kalyoncu Sep 19 '09 at 17:43
    
modern browsers compile javascript into machine code. For example Chrome's V8 and FF's TraceMonkey. –  Peter Sep 19 '09 at 17:45

Try a combination with the build-in method slice and splice:

Array.prototype.splice.apply(dst, [j, i].concat(src.slice(k, k+i)));
share|improve this answer
    
Sorry. Your solution is around 50 times slower. –  Peter Sep 19 '09 at 17:55
    
Not if you want it to perform well. –  Derrick Apr 18 '11 at 11:42

You can create a completely unrolled version, eg via

function compileCopy(count, di, si) {
    var sb = new Array(count);
    di += count, si += count;
    while(count--) sb[count] = --di + ']=src[' + --si;
    return new Function('dst[' + sb.join('];dst[') + '];');
}

var copy = compileCopy(0x4000, 0x4000, 0x8000);

In Opera, it will be slightly faster than the looping version. In FF... not (there might even be some bug somewhere).

share|improve this answer
    
But the start indexes are hardcoded into the "compiled" function. For each copy call you would need to "compile" it again. –  Peter Sep 19 '09 at 19:11
    
your benchmark code has hardcoded indices as well –  Christoph Sep 19 '09 at 19:19
    
but they could be function parameters without performance loss. –  Peter Sep 19 '09 at 19:52

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