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I have a potentially impossible desire. I have a class, from which I want to build several subclasses. Each subclass will implement the same interface, but I kind of want the BASE class to call methods of that interface.

Here's the compiler-error-y version of what I want:

public class Class1
{
    public function Class1()
    {
        initialize();
    }
}

public interface Int
{
    function initialize():void;
}

public class Class2 extends Class1 implements Int
{
    public function Class2()
    {
        super();
    }

    public function initialize():void
    {
        // Code unique to the class goes here.
    }
}

Obviously, this code breaks, even though I have no intention to create an instance of Class1. It also looks dumb in this simplified version, but it kind of shows the reason why I want this: I want each class to automatically call initialize() in its constructor, thus it makes sense to keep it in the superclass.

Now, I could do something like this:

public class Class1
{
    public function Class1() implements Int
    {
        initialize();
    }

    public function initialize():void {}
}

public interface Int
{
    function initialize():void;
}

public class Class2 extends Class1 implements Int
{
    public function Class2()
    {
        super();
    }

    public override function initialize():void
    {
        // Code unique to the class goes here.
    }
}

This is kind of where I'm at right now, but placing the method in the superclass and overriding it in the subclasses defeats the purpose of having the interface; the initialize() method requirement is met simply by extending the original class, and there is no way I know of that I can FORCE each subclass to override that method. I can, of course, omit the call in the base class and insert it into each of the subclasses, but I can't enforce the requirement to have THAT either.

So my question is, is there a version of #1 (calling interface methods in a base class that doesn't implement the interface) that won't break, or a version of #2 (overriding the method in question) that will REQUIRE initialize() to be overridden by the subclass?

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class1 already implements Int. If Class1 doens't need it then dont specify it there just on class2. –  Lukasz 'Severiaan' Grela Jan 23 '13 at 21:41
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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If I interpreted your question correctly, you want to have an Interface implemented on subclasses of Class1, but not Class1 directly. You also want to be able to call the methods within the Interface from Class1, so that they are automatically called when you subclass it.

I'll point out now that this potentially bad design, but regardless here's what you can do:

The Interface:

A basic interface for testing:

public interface Interface
{

    function init():void;

}

Your base class:

This is the class that will call init() if any subclasses implement Interface:

public class Base
{

    public function Base()
    {
        // Use 'is' to check if this implements Interface.
        if(this is Interface)
        {
            // Use 'as' to refer to .init() within Interface.
            (this as Interface).init();
        }
        else
        {
            // Interface was not implemented.
            // Throw an error or whatever you find necessary.
            //
        }
    }

}

The trick here is that we use is to determine whether the subclass has implemented Interface or not. If it has, we can access methods defined by it via as and go ahead and call them.

The subclass:

This is your straightforward subclass for testing:

public class Sub extends Base implements Interface
{

    public function init():void
    {
        trace('Success!');
    }

}

If you go ahead and test that by constructing an instance of Sub, you'll notice Success! in the output panel as expected.

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Interesting, I interpreted the question differently, I assumed that the derived class would always extend the interface. That mainly eceleto just wants to ensure initialize is implemented in the derived classes. –  Mike McFarland Jan 23 '13 at 22:35
    
@MikeMcFarland Ah, so you mean that my answer is flawed because you can go ahead and extend Base without implementing Interface? –  Marty Jan 23 '13 at 22:36
    
Well actually after your edit, it suffers only the same flaw as my answer. It throws a runtime error if the interface is not implemented. I like your solution, at the least its more straightforward in the derived classes, you just implement the interface. Only issue is you have to remember to implement the interface whenever extending Base, but if that's a well stated convention in your program, so be it. –  Mike McFarland Jan 23 '13 at 23:04
    
Thanks, this sounds like exactly what I needed. I'll give it a try. –  eclecto Jan 24 '13 at 2:35
    
Yes, it's doing exactly what I wanted. Thanks again. –  eclecto Jan 25 '13 at 3:59
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Have the base class extend the interface. And then the sub class override base methods. This will allow you to call methods from your base.

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I feel your pain, an abstract class would be very useful here. Unfortunately those don't exist in AS3. The best I've been able to do in your situation is only a slight alteration from your suggestion.

public class Class1
{
    public function Class1() implements Int
    {
        initialize();
    }

    public function initialize():void {
        throw new Error("Subclass of Class1 must override initialize.");
    }
}

Obviously this will give you a run-time error, not a compile-time error. I still only use this strategy sparingly, since declaring methods and throwing errors isn't clean and is a concession. Sometimes however, the advantages are worth it.

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Yeah, once again, we're defeating the purpose of the interface. I want to use it to make sure each subclass has its own implementation of the methods in question. If I happen to bring in another developer, or if I just get lazy myself as I go along, forgetting to add a method won't throw up any interface flags if a "dummy" version of the method already exists in the parent class. –  eclecto Jan 24 '13 at 2:56
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