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I've been tasked with developing a tool that scans a large collection of Java projects (~7000 .java files) for the use of deprecated methods/properties/APIs. It's been specified that the tool scans in a single file at a time, performs some analysis, and outputs a list of offending files, along with the line number the deprecated piece of code appeared at. I've been using the Eclipse JDT Java parser to effect this, however I just can't seem to figure this out.

Because each file is scanned in one at a time, the compiler doesn't know which methods are deprecated and which aren't, so I can't just call some isDeprecated() method and leave it at that.

I compiled a list of all the deprecated methods to look for in the code, and checked that against every method invocation in the code base (there are a lot of them), but that was an ugly solution and produced an unacceptably large number of false positives, due to either the limitations of the parser or the limitations of my knowledge of the parser.

Would I be able to just build each individual project and output the compiler warnings to some .txt file or something? This is my first time dealing with projects of this scale so I'm not really sure how stuff like this works. And this doesn't exactly fit the specification and it would be rather time consuming I'd imagine but if that's what it takes then that's what it takes.

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You could just use a tool that already does this: sonarsource.org/… –  parsifal Jan 23 '13 at 22:05
    
What is the rationale behind the single pass restriction? Seems unreasonable. Would it be easier to compile everything and process the compiler output instead of processing the source files? –  Miserable Variable Jan 23 '13 at 22:12
    
Don't reinvent the wheel... there are static analysis tools, like Sonar mentioned above, that already do this. –  cjstehno Jan 23 '13 at 22:27
    
The reason for the single pass restriction was because I'm supposed to make it work with the company's platform, which scans in a single file at a time, but I suppose at this point that's not going to happen. I'll take a look at sonar, thanks all. –  user2005457 Jan 24 '13 at 14:37

2 Answers 2

Eclipse already does that for you. You just need to enable the compiler warning Java development user guide > Reference > Preferences > Java > Compiler > Deprecated API

In case you did not know, the Eclipse compiler can also be used outside the Eclipse IDE, instructions can be found in Eclipse help.

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Interesting question! You said you compiled a list of all the deprecated methods to look for in the code, and checked that against every method invocation in the code base.

I think this is a good way for doing that if you use JDT. What can be improved is getting the deprecated methods with their corresponding class and package when you parsing the target library/package. For example, if you parse SDK, you get all deprecated method and their corresponding class and package. With those qualified method names, you can do search on the large collection of Java projects by matching names of method, class and package. This should greatly reduce the false positives.

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