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I have written a Matrix class. It does multiplications between matrices. Sometimes multiplication of matrices yield a 1x1 matrix (e.g.; inner product of two column vectors). Is it possible to make a Matrix object directly return a scalar value when it is one-by-one?

template <class T> class Matrix
{
    public:
        // ...
        T&       operator()(uint64_t unRow, uint64_t unCol = 0) throw(MatrixOutOfRange);
        const T& operator()(uint64_t unRow, uint64_t unCol = 0) const throw(MatrixOutOfRange);
        // ...
    protected:
        std::vector<T> MatrixArray;
        // ...
};

// ...

template <class T>
T & Matrix<T>::operator()(uint64_t unRow, uint64_t unCol /*= 0*/) throw(MatrixOutOfRange)
{
    /* Bound checking here */
    return MatrixArray[m_unColSize * unRow + unCol];
}

template <class T>
const T & Matrix<T>::operator()(uint64_t unRow, uint64_t unCol /*= 0*/) const throw(MatrixOutOfRange)
{
    /* Bound checking here */
    return MatrixArray[m_unColSize * unRow + unCol];
}

// ...

Example code:

Latex image

Matrix<double> A (3, 1,    1.0, 2.0, 3.0);
Matrix<double> AT(1, 3,    1.0, 2.0, 3.0);   // Transpose of the A matrix
Matrix<double> B (3, 1,    4.0, 5.0, 6.0);
Matrix<double> C();

C = AT * B;
double Result1 = C(0, 0);
double Result2 = (AT * B)(0, 0);
double Result3 = A.InnerProductWith(B)(0, 0);

I want to drop the unnecessary element location specifier arguments (0, 0) when the result is a one-by-one matrix. Like this:

C = AT * B;
double Result1 = C;
double Result2 = AT * B;
double Result3 = A.InnerProductWith(B);

It is OK if it throws an exception if the result is not one-by-one.

share|improve this question
2  
This is possible but most definitely a Bad Idea. –  David Brown Jan 23 '13 at 22:11
    
C is a function (that you never defined) that takes no arguments and returns a Matrix<double>. For a default constructed object, leave off the parentheses. –  Benjamin Lindley Jan 23 '13 at 22:37
    
@BenjaminLindley is referring to the line Matrix<double> C();. It's a deceptive parse. –  Drew Dormann Jan 23 '13 at 22:53

3 Answers 3

Yes.

This would work similarly to std::vector::at(), which is also a compile-time call that will always throw unless certain runtime conditions are met.

A conversion operator to type T would look like this:

template <class T> class Matrix
{
    public:
        // ...
        operator T &() { 
           // Throw here if size is not 1x1...

           return (*this)( 0, 0 ); 
        }

        operator T const &() const { 
           // Throw here if size is not 1x1...

           return (*this)( 0, 0 ); 
        }
        // ...
};

All your example code would work, as-written.

share|improve this answer
    
But the matrix's size is not part of the type, so this conversion would be present for matrices of all sizes. –  juanchopanza Jan 23 '13 at 22:14
2  
@juanchopanza that's correct, and a bit unsavory, but it was explicitly part of the question. "It is OK if it throws an exception if the result is not one-by-one." –  Drew Dormann Jan 23 '13 at 22:20
    
operator T &() and operator T const &() const would better match the semantics of operator() indexing. –  Potatoswatter Jan 23 '13 at 22:43
    
@Potatoswatter Yes, I should have done that! Now syntax like myMatrix1x1 = 0.0 is also valid. Thanks. –  Drew Dormann Jan 23 '13 at 22:51

Not unless the size becomes part of the type. Else, you will have to either always have a scalar conversion, or never. You cannot change the type's compile-time features (whether or not it has an implicit conversion) based on a run-time fact- whether the size is 1 in both dimensions or not. That would require precognition on the part of the compiler.

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I think a better way to do this would be to make your sizes part of the type:

template <class T, size_t NRows, size_t NCols>
class Matrix
{
public:
    // ...
protected:
    // ...
    T M_storage[NRows][NCols]; // Or something...
};

Then use template specialization to add the conversion operator to the 1x1 Matrix:

template <class T>
class Matrix<T, 1, 1>
{
public:
    // ...
    operator T ()
    {
       return M_storage;//[0][0]; 
    }
protected:
    // ...
    //T M_storage[1][1]; // Or something...
    // Or even
    T M_storage;
};
share|improve this answer
    
Would be safer to use CRTP to add the feature without rewriting the whole Matrix class. –  Potatoswatter Jan 23 '13 at 22:42
    
An even better idea might be to have both types (Fixed and Flex Matrix). Implicit conversion only works for Fixed<1,1,T>. Flex has a member function to convert to scalar. Fixed is implemented in terms of Flex, but also gives you size guarantees at compile time. Oh, and while you are at it, [] is to get elements out (either [a,b,...] or [a][b][...]), () is to evaluate as a linear function on an argument. –  Yakk Jan 23 '13 at 22:45

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