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I always forget to add the 'static' prefix to my variabeles and functions, and so the GCC marks them as extern. Is it possible to change this behaviour so that it marks everything static by default. And is there a performance difference between the two types at runtime, or is it more a formality?

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You might want to dump symbols from the compiled code to see if there's anything you've forgotten to make static. Try nm, objdump and other tools like these. –  Alexey Frunze Jan 24 '13 at 10:06

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Is it possible to change this behaviour so that it marks everything static by default.

Not to my knowledge.

And is there a performance difference between the two types at runtime, or is it more a formality?

Yes, gcc is able to perform further optimizations when objects or functions are static specified. For example, gcc(even in -O0) will inline a static specified function that is called only once.

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Do you know if GCC will detect that the variabele isnt used in other files, and threats it as static at compile-time? Or do I always need to explicitly add it? –  Muis Jan 23 '13 at 23:11
    
@Joshua It will not. Or at least not by default. Newer gcc versions have link time optimizations: see gcc options -flto and -fwhole-program. –  ouah Jan 23 '13 at 23:29

First of all: The extern modifier is not default. That qualifier indicates that the item mentioned will be defined in another compilation unit, so it's only appropriate for declaring things like global variables.

There is no way to make the static modifier default, because there is no dynamic modifier which would cancel out this default. As such, there'd be no way to write working code with that default in place: every function and variable would be static, which would cause the compiler to generate an empty output file!

Is there a performance difference between the two types at runtime, or is it more a formality?

The compiler can perform some optimizations on static functions and variables which cannot be performed on dynamic ones. In particular, static functions and variables which are never referenced may be dropped entirely, and static functions can be inlined more aggressively.

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If extern is not the default, what is the default then? –  Muis Jan 23 '13 at 23:02
    
The default is nothing (i.e, no modifier). Static variables do not have linkage -- they cannot be referenced from other files. –  duskwuff Jan 23 '13 at 23:05
    
So what is the difference between 'nothing' and extern then? Because it sounds like they offer the same. It seems weird that there is no option to use static by default, because the times that I need global variabeles to be accessible from other files are much more rare compared to the times I need them to be static. Hopefully GCC is smart enough to notice at compile-time that the variabele isnt used anywhere else, and compiles it as static. –  Muis Jan 23 '13 at 23:10
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Just remember to type static in front of things! ;) –  Mats Petersson Jan 23 '13 at 23:27
    
Difference: extern generates linkage only, not storage. GCC cannot detect that a variable isn't referenced externally, because it only looks at one C file at a time. By the time linking happens, it's too late to static-ify anything. –  duskwuff Jan 23 '13 at 23:43

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