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I'm trying to figure out a way to take a copy of my base class, and create an instance of my subclass that references the same address space as the base class.

So for example, I have a number of members in my base class Foo, and I have a couple extra members in the subclass Bar. How do I create a Bar from my Foo such that changing x in Bar also changes x in Foo.

ex)

struct Foo{
    int x;
    Foo(){
        x = 0;
    }
}

struct Bar : Foo{
    int z;
    //?? what to do here
}

int main(){
   Foo foo();
   Bar bar(foo); //??
   bar.x = 7;
   assert(bar.x == foo.x);
}

I know this is a strange question, and I haven't worded it very well. If anyone knows an answer or if I'm being ridiculous and there is an answer on stackoverflow that I just can't find fort this, I will be very appreciative. Thank you for your time.

share|improve this question
    
How is z going to be stored in an "Foo" object? There is literally no way you can store more data in an object that has already been allocated - that is a stackoverflow problem (and I don't mean another post on this site, but you would be writing to data outside your own datastructure - which is never good!) –  Mats Petersson Jan 23 '13 at 22:48
    
That's not what I want, z is an extra value I have in my Bar that i need for other calculations. x is the thing I need to change if I change it for my Bar object. –  banshee_walk_sly Jan 23 '13 at 22:49
2  
I suspect you are doing an "XY-question", you want to do X, you think Y is the solution, so therefor ask how to do Y. If you explain a bit more what you are actually trying to do, I'm sure we can help you with a solution. –  Mats Petersson Jan 23 '13 at 22:49
    
I may be, but I'm not sure at all how to describe my X question. I have a set of platform specific code that requires a couple extra data members in my class. I need to use those data members during that code, but also be able to modify my old values. later when I'm back in the platform non-specific code, I need access to those modified values, but I can't use the Derived class. Does that make sense at all? –  banshee_walk_sly Jan 23 '13 at 22:51
    
Note that f is a function... –  Kerrek SB Jan 23 '13 at 22:53

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Depending on how you want/can approach this, you've got two options:

1) Indirection

struct Bar
{
private:
    Bar() = delete; //eradicate the default constructor
public:
    //Foo member references
    int &x;

    //Bar members
    int z;

    Bar(Foo& f): x(f.x) { } //of course, you may initialize z as well
};

Usage:

Foo foo_obj;

//new scope begins (can be a function call, for example)
{
    Bar bar_obj(foo_obj);

    //do stuff with bar_obj
    //...
    //work done

} //scope ends; bar_obj is destroyed

//magic! foo_obj has been updated with the correct values all this time

2) Polymorphism

struct Bar: public Foo
{        
    //Bar members
    int z;

    Bar(): Foo() { }
};

Usage:

Foo foo_obj;

//new scope begins (can be a function call, for example)
{
    Bar bar_obj;
    static_cast<Foo&>(bar_obj) = foo_obj; //we'll use Foo's default (or user-defined) assignment operator
    //note that you need to cast to reference

    //do stuff with bar_obj
    //...
    //work done

    foo_obj = bar_obj; //you will need to copy your data back at this point
    //also note foo_obj has not been updated during this time, which may not be desirable
} //scope ends
share|improve this answer
    
The Polymorphic approach appeals to me more, however, I get an error on the static cast that no user-defined conversion from foo to bar exists. –  banshee_walk_sly Jan 23 '13 at 23:16
    
@banshee_walk_sly Fixed. The cast was supposed to go on the derived object. –  Andrei Tita Jan 23 '13 at 23:26
    
Excellent! This should do what I'm looking for. Thank you very much. –  banshee_walk_sly Jan 23 '13 at 23:29

Your current code makes a fresh copy of your Foo when you initialize the Bar, this means it has it's own set of separate values stored within it's structure. In order to let the Foo and Bar share a value you will need to change it to a pointer or reference. You will also need to specify a constructor for Bar that takes a Foo as it's argument.

Here's one way to do it, obviously not ideal because the value of X is being stored as a global, ultimately you are going to need somewhere to store it and exactly where that is depends on your needs.

int x_storage;

struct Foo{
    int& x;
    Foo(): x(x_storage){
        x = 0;
    }
};

struct Bar : Foo{
    int z;
    Bar(Foo& f)
    {
        x = f.x;
    }
};

int main(){
   Foo f = Foo();
   Bar b = Bar(f); //??
   b.x = 7;
   assert(b.x == f.x);
};

EDIT: Judging by your comments, perhaps inheretence isn't what you are after at all, you may simply want to use a "has a" relationship to wrap a Foo inside a Bar, like so:

struct Foo{
    int x;
    Foo(){
        x = 0;
    }
};

struct Bar{
    Foo& myFoo;
    int z;
    Bar(Foo& f): myFoo(f){
    }
};

int main(){
   Foo f = Foo();
   Bar b = Bar(f); //??
   b.myFoo.x = 7;
   assert(b.myFoo.x == f.x);
};
share|improve this answer
1  
Whilst that solves the problem exactly as stated, how would you go about doing an array of Foo and Bar objects? –  Mats Petersson Jan 23 '13 at 23:16
    
Putting "x_storage" inside a Foo object would be workable, despite ending up with a duplicate storage you are free to ignore it (though memory usage might become an issue). You could also allocate memory on the heap and use reference counting to ensure it's freed correctly. –  Jason Jan 23 '13 at 23:23
    
Inside or outside foo makes no difference, a static variable is not part of the structure. Yes, allocating on the stack would work, but really a little complicated... :)( –  Mats Petersson Jan 23 '13 at 23:25

Right, so I'm goiing to assume that you also have the ability to create your objeccts:

class Foo  // Base class. 
{
   public:
     int x;
};


class Bar
{
   public:
     int z;
}

Some function:

void frobb(Foo *fooPtr)
{
    if(fooPtr->x != 7)
    {
        cout << "Bad value of x\n"; 
    }
    ... 
}

....

// some of your code (in a different file probably.

Bar b;
... do stuff with b. 
b.x = 7;
frobb(&b);

Unless there is really something broken in the API, you shouldn't ever need to make a Bar out of a Foo, or a Foo from a Bar. That's just bad design.

Edit:

In the case described in the comment:

Some code creates a Bar object:

Bar b;

extern void some_generic_api(Foo *fptr);

... do stuff with b, including setting your own variables. 

b.x = 7;
some_generic_api(&b);   // WOrks like a "Foo" object without problem. 

... some other bit of code ... 

void frobb(Foo *fptr)
{
    // Note: Don't do this unless you are SURE it's a Bar object you actually have! 
    Bar *bptr = reinterpret_cast<Bar*>(fptr);   

    .. do stuff that requires Bar object using bptr;
    bptr->x = 19; 

    some_generic_api(bptr);   // This will work fine. 
}
share|improve this answer
    
My problem lies with when I dip into windows specific code. I basically need to add a PROCESS_INFORMATION object to my Foo. My approach for solving this was to add a Bar subclass that is in the windows section and adds that extra object. However, stuff I do modifies my other properties, and I need those modifications to be maintained. Your code takes a Bar and sets a value then passes that Bar in as a Foo. I need to take a Foo in as a Bar. –  banshee_walk_sly Jan 23 '13 at 23:27
    
Ah, so in my code above, you are the owner of "frobb"? –  Mats Petersson Jan 23 '13 at 23:28
    
yes, and I receive the Foo, but need to work with a Bar. –  banshee_walk_sly Jan 23 '13 at 23:31
    
And are you the one creating the object in the first place? –  Mats Petersson Jan 23 '13 at 23:37
    
Yes, but the object needs to be platform independent outside of this function. –  banshee_walk_sly Jan 23 '13 at 23:39

Just another option that no one has mentioned yet, but if you want only a single variable allocated in memory for all objects of with Foo as a base class, you can use static member variables.

struct Foo{
    static int x;
    Foo() {
        x = 0;
    }
};

int Foo::x = 0;

struct Bar : Foo {
    int z;
};

int main(){
   Foo foo();
   Bar bar();
   bar.x = 7;
   assert(&bar.x == &foo.x); // now using the same memory address
}

And, as a note, the static keyword has many meanings in the C++ language so I would suggest looking the rest of them up if you are unfamiliar (here is an msdn page msdn page on the C++ static keyword as a starter) I cannot say I use all meanings of the static keyword with much frequency (particularly static variables at function scope), but they are handy tools to have in the tool box nonetheless should the correct situation present itself.

share|improve this answer
    
I like the idea, and this might work for some people. However, my code uses multiple instances of Foo and Bar which would mean the statics would refer to the data for all of the objects. –  banshee_walk_sly Jan 25 '13 at 16:12

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