Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

Okay, so i am continuing to work on my little game engine to teach me C#/C++ more. Now i am attempting to write a way of storing data in a binary format, that i created. (This is learning, i want to do this my self from scratch). What i am wondering what is the best way of dealing with variable length arrays inside a structure when reading it in C++?

E.g. Here is what i currently have for my structures:

 [StructLayout(LayoutKind.Sequential)]
    public struct FooBinaryHeader
    {
        public Int32 m_CheckSumLength;
        public byte[] m_Checksum;
        public Int32 m_NumberOfRecords;
        public FooBinaryRecordHeader[] m_BinaryRecordHeaders;
        public FooBinaryRecord[] m_BinaryRecords;
    }

    [StructLayout(LayoutKind.Sequential)]
    public struct FooBinaryRecordHeader
    {
        public Int32 m_FileNameLength;
        public char[] m_FileName;
        public Int64 m_Offset;
    }

    [StructLayout(LayoutKind.Sequential)]
    public struct FooBinaryRecord
    {
        public bool m_IsEncrypted;
        public Int64 m_DataSize;
        public byte[] m_Data;
    }

Now how would i go about in C++ to actually read this in as a structure in C++? I was kinda hoping to get around reading each of the elements one by one and copying them into a structure.

The only real tutorial i found on this is this: http://www.gamedev.net/community/forums/topic.asp?topic%5Fid=310409&whichpage=1&#1989200

I'll take a wild guess and say reading this into a C++ structure is not really possible correct?

share|improve this question
up vote 0 down vote accepted

You can read it from binary format mapping a copy of these structures. Each array should be treated as a pointer and you should have a integer with size of this array.

For example in

C#

    [StructLayout(LayoutKind.Sequential)]
    public struct A
    {
        public Int32 m_CheckSumLength;
        public byte[] m_Checksum;
    }

C++

    struct A {
        int length
        char* vector
    }

Notes: byte has the same size of char.

When you read from a binary you can read the first 4 byte (int is 32 aka 4 byte) and allocate 4 + (readed length) after that you can read directly to the allocated buffer and treat as a A structure.


    
share|improve this answer

There's no such thing as a variable length array in a structure.

Suppose I had a structure point such as

struct point
{
    int x;
    int y;
}

If I wanted an array of 5 of these, the compiler would essentially reserve space for 10 ints. What happens if I ask for an array of structures, of which each contains a variable length array? There's no way to align those in memory since we can't know how much space to reserve for each one.

What you can do is to declare a pointer to the type of which you want a variable length array, because a pointer is a constant size. Then, you allocate enough memory for however many instances of that type, and point to it that way. You'll probably need to also add a length field to the struct so you know exactly how far you can go past the pointer before you risk segfaulting.

It might get a little hairy going back and forth between managed and unmanaged code and allocating and freeing memory, but that's another good exercise for learning C++ and C# together, if anything.

share|improve this answer

Use Marshall.StructToPtr and copy length of structure.

share|improve this answer
    
Can you explain more? – UberJumper Sep 19 '09 at 18:17

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.