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I am trying to modify /etc/fstab with sed/awk. Much like in this question, however, the solutions in that question aren't quite working for me.

I need to add the nodev (and nosuid) option to nfs or nfs4 mount points.

I have working;

awk '$4!~/nodev/&&$3~"nfs"{$4=$4",nodev"}1' OFS="\t" /etc/fstab > /etc/fstab.tmp && mv /etc/fstab.tmp /etc/fstab

awk '$4!~/nosuid/&&$3~"nfs"{$4=$4",nosuid"}1' OFS="\t" /etc/fstab > /etc/fstab.tmp && mv /etc/fstab.tmp /etc/fstab

However, it obliterates existing white space and replaces with a single tab. My question is: How can I make this change in a less intrusive manner? This answer looked promising, but I don't understand it well enough to adapt it to my use.

I am open to solutions other than sed or awk, but any other tools need to exist in a default Red Hat/CentOS environment (during %post in Kickstart.)

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Why set OFS when you don't want the fields separated uniformly by tabs? Try leaving OFS unset; awk tries to preserve the input spacing when it can. –  Jonathan Leffler Jan 23 '13 at 23:41
    
If I leave it unset, there's no field separator at all. It strips all white space. –  Aaron Copley Jan 24 '13 at 14:31

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Unfortunately, awk does tend to munge whitespace if you change any of the fields. But this is pretty easy with sed. If your sed supports \S to represent non-whitespace, you can do:

sed 's/\S\S*/&,nodev/4' to append ,nodev to the 4th column. So try:

sed -e '/nfs/{/nodev/!s/\S\S*/&,nodev/4}' -e '/nfs/{/nosuid/!s/\S\S*/&,nosuid/4}'

If your sed does not allow /S, use [^ ] instead (actuall space and a tab inside brackets.) This does not limit the match of nfs to the 3rd column. Exercise left for the reader.

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Works great and it makes sense. (Mostly..) Thanks! –  Aaron Copley Jan 24 '13 at 14:39

Even though this is a little late--here is a method I use in my KickStart file to alter the /etc/fstab

    sed -i '/tmp\s/ s/defaults/rw,nodev,noexec,nosuid/' /etc/fstab

Basically, when it sees the line with /tmp followed by at least one space--it will do a substitution of the word defaults with rw,nodev,noexec,nosuid. No fuss, no muss.

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