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I'm using a complicated C code that includes many, many compilation options. This makes the code very hard to read. I'd like to produce a copy of the code reflecting the way it's actually compiled. I've gotten pretty good results using the "unifdef" utility, which I didn't know about until recently. However, I'm puzzled why it's so hard to invoke, and am wondering if I'm missing something.

Consider this example:

#ifdef A
  printf("A\n");
#endif
#ifdef B
  printf("B\n");
#endif

If you invoke unifdef with "unifdef -DA junk.c", you get:

  printf("A\n");
#ifdef B
  printf("B\n");
#endif

Because you didn't tell unifdef that B was undefined, it didn't take it out.

I would like the utility to behave such that when I say unifdef -DA, I get instead:

  printf("A\n");

This would correspond to what the C preprocessor is actually doing: whatever branches are undefined are omitted.

To get this behavior with unifdef, I seem to need to use "unifdef -DA -UB junk.c", explicitly telling it that B is undefined. Though maybe I missed a simpler way to invoke it.

I wrote a python script to generate the long list of required -D and -U flags from the Makefile of the code I'm using (typically 80 per routine). And the results are excellent. But I'm wondering whether such a script is actually necessary.

It's also possible that another utility (sunifdef? coan?) has my desired behavior built in already; if so, please mention it.

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If you're using GCC (or similar) and you want to see the result of the preprocessor, just use the -E flag. –  Oliver Charlesworth Jan 23 '13 at 23:59
2  
I have seen the result of the preprocessor, and believe me, I don't want to. –  Raymond Nicolet Jan 24 '13 at 1:48

3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

The coan utility does what you need with the -m flag:

$ coan source -DA -m test.c 
  printf("A\n");

From the man page:

-m, --implicit
    Assume that any symbol that is not --define-ed is implicitly
    --undef-ed.
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1  
Thanks. Will try to take a look at coan. Need the sysops to install any package on our main cluster, so will mention it as one of the options. –  Raymond Nicolet Jan 24 '13 at 1:54

If I understood your question correctly, you want to see the code after the pre-processor has ran over it, correct? Then why don't you let the pre-processor run over it and look what output it produces? Just run the compile call using exactly the same arguments you would use when compiling, but add the argument -E to it, which means "Do nothing but pre-processing".

$ cat preproc.c 
#ifdef A
  printf("A\n");
#endif
#ifdef B
  printf("B\n");
#endif

$ gcc -E preproc.c 
# 1 "preproc.c"
# 1 "<built-in>"
# 1 "<command-line>"
# 1 "preproc.c"

$ gcc -E -DA preproc.c 
# 1 "preproc.c"
# 1 "<built-in>"
# 1 "<command-line>"
# 1 "preproc.c"

  printf("A\n");

$ gcc -E -DB preproc.c
# 1 "preproc.c"
# 1 "<built-in>"
# 1 "<command-line>"
# 1 "preproc.c"




  printf("B\n");

$
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1  
No, unifdef is much nicer than running the preprocessor. It does not expand macros, which would make lots of code unreadable. It just collapses ifdefs. –  R.. Jan 24 '13 at 0:24
    
It also doesn't do the includes, which is nice. –  detly Jan 24 '13 at 0:49
    
@detly But those includes may actually contain most of the definitions which are tested throughout the code. If it does not do includes, how would it know about all the #define statements in all those includes? –  Mecki Jan 24 '13 at 0:58
    
@Mecki It doesn't interpret any macros other than the ones you specifically mention on the command line. Apart from the OP's combinatorial problem, this turns out to be exactly what you want when you're refactoring. –  zwol Jan 24 '13 at 1:04
1  
@Mecki - you ask a good question, how do you know something isn't defined in the #include files rather than in compile-time flags. But in this code that isn't how it is set up; I would guess a lot of other codes follow the same pattern. The results of gcc -E are just unreadable (in the real code, not my toy example) because of macros, and the whole point is to make the code readable. –  Raymond Nicolet Jan 24 '13 at 2:06

You can use the unifdefall utility which comes with unifdef. See http://dotat.at/prog/unifdef

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