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I have a seemingly simple query case where adding a constraint causes a major performance decrease. The three columns that are being constrained with the AND clause, are all bigints. If I use any two of them (but not all three) the query runs instantaneously, but as soon as I add a third AND, it runs slow.

WITH tb AS (SELECT
   DISTINCT u.*  
FROM
   [user] u  
INNER JOIN
   user_personal up 
      ON up.user_id = u.user_id        
WHERE
   1=1  
   AND u.site_instance_id = 1      
   AND u.graduation_class_id = 27  
   AND u.graduation_term_id IN (76,75) 
   ) SELECT
   COUNT (*) AS count 
FROM
   ( SELECT
      ROW_NUMBER() OVER (
   ORDER BY
      last_name ASC) AS row,
      * 
   FROM
      tb) sub

Does this have to do with the fact that all three of those columns are bigint? Or does it have to do with table indexes on those columns? (I don't have any indexes set up for those columns). Or could it be something else?

Note - in this case the AND u.site_instance_id = 1 is redundant, but it shouldn't matter, should it?

EDIT After using SET showplan_all ON:

 |--Compute Scalar(DEFINE:([Expr1005]=CONVERT_IMPLICIT(int,[Expr1008],0)))
   |--Stream Aggregate(DEFINE:([Expr1008]=Count(*)))
        |--Nested Loops(Left Semi Join, WHERE:(.[dbo].[user].[user_id] as [u].[user_id]=.[dbo].[user_personal].[user_id] as [up].[user_id]))
             |--Clustered Index Scan(OBJECT:(.[dbo].[user].[PK__user__B9BE370F7F60ED59] AS [u]), WHERE:(.[dbo].[user].[site_instance_id] as [u].[site_instance_id]=(1) AND .[dbo].[user].[graduation_class_id] as [u].[graduation_class_id]=(27) AND (.[dbo].[user].[graduation_term_id] as [u].[graduation_term_id]=(75) OR .[dbo].[user].[graduation_term_id] as [u].[graduation_term_id]=(76))))
             |--Clustered Index Scan(OBJECT:(.[dbo].[user_personal].[PK__user_per__C701FAD641EDCAC5] AS [up]))

... and with only TWO AND clauses...

|--Compute Scalar(DEFINE:([Expr1005]=CONVERT_IMPLICIT(int,[Expr1008],0)))
       |--Stream Aggregate(DEFINE:([Expr1008]=Count(*)))
            |--Hash Match(Left Semi Join, HASH:([u].[user_id])=([up].[user_id]), RESIDUAL:(.[dbo].[user].[user_id] as [u].[user_id]=.[dbo].[user_personal].[user_id] as [up].[user_id]))
                 |--Clustered Index Scan(OBJECT:(.[dbo].[user].[PK__user__B9BE370F7F60ED59] AS [u]), WHERE:(.[dbo].[user].[graduation_class_id] as [u].[graduation_class_id]=(27) AND (.[dbo].[user].[graduation_term_id] as [u].[graduation_term_id]=(75) OR .[dbo].[user].[graduation_term_id] as [u].[graduation_term_id]=(76))))
                 |--Clustered Index Scan(OBJECT:(.[dbo].[user_personal].[PK__user_per__C701FAD641EDCAC5] AS [up]))
share|improve this question
    
What does the execution plan say? I'm guessing there will be a Scan in there. –  DaveShaw Jan 24 '13 at 0:09
    
Try using set showplan on –  gbronner Jan 24 '13 at 0:09
    
Pasting some helpful info in original post after setting showplan_all on. –  Adam Levitt Jan 24 '13 at 0:10
    
No, it is all of the nested queries combined with the join. You should first work on simplifying the query, and then look into caching results. One major thing that will help is if you do not actually need all of the items returned by u.* –  David Jan 24 '13 at 0:15
    
If you look at the estimated execution plan, does it have any suggestions for indexes? Also, what does the query plan look like with only two of the AND clauses? –  Kevin Dahl Jan 24 '13 at 0:25

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I'm still not sure I understand your question -- @Hogan had a much simpler version of your query. Nonetheless, you should have Indexes on each of the fields you join on and any field you consistently search upon.

In your case, I'd make sure you have the following indexes:

  • user.user_id (presumably already has PK)
  • user_personal.user_id
  • user.site_instance_id, user.graduation_class_id and user.graduation_term_id

You may also consider adding indexes to each of the 3 fields in your WHERE criteria individually, but this should prove to yield a better performance. Plus, use @Hogan's query instead.

Good luck.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the answer! The issue was the missing index on user_personal.user_id! –  Adam Levitt Jan 24 '13 at 0:36

There must be more to the story. Clearly the following is the same as the code posted and simpler (and I expect faster):

  SELECT COUNT(DISTINCT u.user_id)) as count
  FROM [user] u  
  INNER JOIN  user_personal up ON up.user_id = u.user_id        
  WHERE
   u.site_instance_id = 1   AND   
   u.graduation_class_id = 27  AND
   u.graduation_term_id IN (76,75) 
share|improve this answer
    
That code is simpler and very slightly faster, but the performance hit remains with the third join, surprisingly. –  Adam Levitt Jan 24 '13 at 0:28
    
The 3rd term being the graduation term? –  Hogan Jan 24 '13 at 0:29
    
it actually doesn't matter which of the three clauses I remove. As soon as I remove any of the three, the query comes back instantaneously. –  Adam Levitt Jan 24 '13 at 0:34

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