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It would appear that _search and _count take different formats for queries. For example, this is my _search query:

{
  query: {
    filtered: {
      query: { match: { Name: "bob" } },
      filter: { term: { GroupIds: 3 } }
    }
  }
}

But in order for _count to comprehend it I need to remove the outer query:

{
  filtered: {
    query: { match: { Name: "bob" } },
    filter: { term: { GroupIds: 3 } }
  }
}

That one will not work with _search. Just to further confuse me more, _search will accept it if both query and filtered are removed:

{
  query: { match: { Name: "bob" } },
  filter: { term: { GroupIds: 3 } }
}

So what is the actual rule for the Query DSL when using _search vs. _count?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Search is one of the most complex operations in elasticsearch and as a result it accepts several different parameters on the top level including query, filter, facets, size and so on.

The query parameter should contain a query as defined by Query DSL. It can be any query including match_all or filtered. For example, here is how search request would look like that accepts all records and returns top 20.

{
    "query": {
        "match_all": {}
    },
    "size": 20
}

The filter parameter in the search request can accept a filter (again as defined in Query DSL). This filter has special function in the search - it doesn't affect any facets in the request. So, typically it makes sense to use the filter parameter only with faceted search when you want to filter search results but you don't want to affect facets. In all other cases, the filtered query would typically produces faster results.

Speaking of which, the filtered query is a query, so it can be used in the query parameter of the search request. It's also a compound query. It accepts another query in its query parameter and a filter in its filter parameter and produces a compound query that returns only documents that satisfy both the query and the filter that it consists of. In other words, the filter parameter in the filtered query affects both search results and facets, while the filter parameter in the search query affects only search result and doesn't affect facets.

And finally the count request. The count requests is much simpler than the search request. It doesn't work with facets and size parameter wouldn't really make much sense since we always request complete count. So, all the count request expects is one query on the top level. For example, in order to count all documents the count request would contain something like this:

{
    "match_all": {}
}
share|improve this answer
    
Great explanation Igor, as usual! –  javanna Jan 24 '13 at 12:39
    
Thanks for the detailed explanation. Makes a lot more sense now. –  Arne Claassen Jan 24 '13 at 17:46

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