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I am trying to modularise a lengthy if..else function.

$condition = "$a < $b";
if($condition)
{
    $c++;
}

Is there any way of translating the literal string into a logical expression?

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1  
You could do this with eval, but the standard approach would be to define a bunch of functions... –  Oliver Charlesworth Jan 24 '13 at 1:24
    
maybe you should explain, what exactly you mean with "modularise". –  fschmengler Jan 24 '13 at 1:36
    
Please show your lengthy if..else block (not function). I'm almost sure, the solution isn't 'modularizing'. –  markus Jan 24 '13 at 1:37
1  
Lenghty if else blocks are often a sign that you're violating some principles of clean coding. –  markus Jan 24 '13 at 1:39
    
hence the need to modularise.. –  verbumSapienti Apr 16 '13 at 0:35

4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted

I am trying to modularise a lengthy if..else function.

You don't need to put the condition in a string for that, just store the boolean true or false:

$condition = ($a < $b);
if($condition)
{
    $c++;
}

the values of $a and $b may change between definition of $condition and its usage

One solution would be a Closure (assuming that definition and usage are happening in the same scope):

$condition = function() use (&$a, &$b) {
    return $a < $b;
}
$a = 1;
$b = 2;
if ($condition()) {
    echo 'a is less than b';
}

But I don't know if this makes sense for you without remotely knowing what you are trying to accomplish.

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the values of $a and $b may change between definition of $condition and its usage. –  hek2mgl Jan 24 '13 at 1:26
1  
Then you could define it as a closure. See edit. –  fschmengler Jan 24 '13 at 1:33
    
If you remove the part above the closure stuff it would be the best answer (what it already is :) ) –  hek2mgl Jan 24 '13 at 1:40
    
I won't remove it to leave the answer more generalized for future readers. Pick what you need ;) –  fschmengler Jan 24 '13 at 1:43
1  
You will be happy to hear that you are wrong :) Otherwise my first solution would be perfectly fine. Did you notice the references (&) in the use clause? –  fschmengler Jan 24 '13 at 1:51

Use lambda if you know variables that are enough to determine result

$f = function ($a, $b) { return $a < $b; }

if ($f($x, $y)){}
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+1. Though you don't need lambda here, just a plain old function declaration will do just as well :) –  Ja͢ck Jan 24 '13 at 3:11

you could do this using eval. not sure why you wouldn't just evaluate the condition immediately, though.

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1  
eval is never the solution of the problem. We should avoid using it. –  Kasyx Jan 24 '13 at 12:06
<?php
     $a=0;
     $b=1;
    function resultofcondition()
    {
        global $a,$b;
        return $a<$b;
    }
    if(resultofcondition()){
        echo " You are dumb,";
    }else{
        echo " I am dumb,"; 
    }
    $a=1;
    $b=0;
    if(resultofcondition()){
        echo " You were correct.";
    }else{
        echo " in your face.";
    }
?>

Indeed thanks for commenting that out, was missing the GLOBAL parameter, for those who voted down, what would that code output? ¬_¬ w/e have fun xD

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1  
This does not work in PHP, $a and $b are not available in the function scope. –  fschmengler Jan 24 '13 at 1:34
    
They are .-. .-. –  Ricardo Ortega Magaña Jan 24 '13 at 2:20
    
@RicardoOrtegaMagaña They most certainly are not, unless you use global $a, $b; –  Ja͢ck Jan 24 '13 at 2:55
    
This last comment doesn't add anything useful to the answer. –  Gustavo Rodrigues Mar 27 at 14:25

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