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I have the following function that finds the greatest common divisor of 2 integers. I don't understand what's happening in the return greatestCommonDivisor(b, (a % b)); part.

If I do greatestCommonDivisor(8, 12) I get 4 which is right but when I tried to evaluate the return greatestCommonDivisor(b, (a % b)); part I get (12, (8 % 12)) which simplifies to (12, 0) how does this equal 4?

// Finds greatest common divisor
function greatestCommonDivisor(a, b) {
    if (b == 0) {
        return a;
    }

    return greatestCommonDivisor(b, (a % b));
}
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8 % 12 is 8 (not 0), so the next call is greatestCommonDivisor(12, 8). Then you have (8, 12 % 8) which is (8, 4), etc. until b is 0 and a is returned. –  Felix Kling Jan 24 '13 at 1:39
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3 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The function is using recursion to call itself until it meets a base condition which returns your actual answer.

In the case of greatestCommonDivisor(8, 12) the following occurs:

  1. b != 0 so call greatestCommonDivisor(12, 8 % 12) //8 % 12 = 8
  2. b != 0 so call greatestCommonDivisor(8, 12 % 8) // 12 % 8 = 4
  3. b != 0 so call greatestCommonDivisor(4, 8 % 4) // 8 % 4 = 0
  4. b == 0 so return 4
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It's a recursive function. It doesn't return two values, it returns a after calling itself over and over with different (smaller) arguments, until b equals 0 (meaning, you can't divide or take a modulus anymore).

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Until b == 0, actually. :) –  Gordon Freeman Jan 24 '13 at 1:40
    
Should be === :) –  bfavaretto Jan 24 '13 at 1:41
    
Should be, I concur, but 'taint. –  Gordon Freeman Jan 24 '13 at 1:44
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This is a basic algorithm to find out the greatest common divisor between two numbers.

The function returns a call to itself with two other parameters, not returns two values (b, (a%b)) as you thought :)

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