Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Here's an example I ran across:

private function bitwiseAnd(a:int, b:int):int {
    var result:int = 0;
    var n:int = 1;
    while ((a > 0) && (b > 0)) {
        if (((a % 2) == 1) && ((b % 2) == 1)) {
            result += n;    
        }
        a = a / 2;
        b = b / 2;
        n = n * 2;
    }
    return result;
}

So basically all I need then is bitwiseOr and bitwiseNot and I'm set.
The reason is that Pixel Bender doesn't support bitwise ops (inexplicably) but does support various math operations. Also they don't support loops for Flash either, but the above can just be expanded out.

I thought about doing bitwise ops without bitwise operators a while back, but couldn't picture how to do it. I wouldn't know how the above was derived logically either.

share|improve this question
    
Sorry this isn't as complicated as I thought - nevermind. –  Mark Sep 19 '09 at 19:13
    
BTW, Pixel Bender in Flash do not support custom function either... But yes, you can inline it manually... –  Andy Li Sep 20 '09 at 4:40
add comment

1 Answer

Seems like a basic exercise - especially 'OR' (change 2 appearances of '&&' to '||'):

private function bitwiseOr(a:int, b:int):int {
    var result:int = 0;
    var n:int = 1;
    while ((a > 0) || (b > 0)) {
        if (((a % 2) == 1) || ((b % 2) == 1)) {
            result += n;    
        }
        a = a / 2;
        b = b / 2;
        n = n * 2;
    }
    return result;
}

There's a bit more work to do with Not - because you can't stop the loop early and you need to know how many bits to deal with. The final problem is how to deal with the sign bit; that needs to be flipped too. Ideally, we'd use unsigned integers - I'm not sure whether they are an option. This code avoids the issues: it flips 31 bits, leaving the 32nd bit as an exercise for the reader.

private function bitwiseNot(a:int):int {
    var result:int = 0;
    var n:int = 1;
    var i:int = 0;
    while (i < 31)  {
        if ((a % 2) == 0) {
            result += n;    
        }
        a = a / 2;
        n = n * 2;
        i++;
    }
    return result;
}
share|improve this answer
    
To flip the sign bit, replace "return result;" with "return result + 1<<31"; –  Igor ostrovsky Sep 19 '09 at 19:23
    
Hey thanks everyone for the instant feedback (this forum is amazing) but as I said I realized the problem wasn't a big deal almost immediately after I wrote the question. But I will look at all the posts provided. Thanks again. –  Mark Sep 19 '09 at 19:29
    
But << is a bitwise operator –  Carson Myers Sep 19 '09 at 19:29
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.