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I want to do something like this

Insert into abc(col1, col2, col3) select col1, 1, col3 from xyz where somecondition
Insert into abc(col1, col2, col3) select col1, 2, col3 from xyz where somecondition
Insert into abc(col1, col2, col3) select col1, 3, col3 from xyz where somecondition
Insert into abc(col1, col2, col3) select col1, 4, col3 from xyz where somecondition
...

So there is only second column value that is changing and all else are same.

Is there any better or compact way to do the above? May be something in one query!

I am using MySql

Edit:

I am using this inside a stored procedure.

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Create the table with col2 as AUTO_INCREMENT, see dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.0/en/example-auto-increment.html –  ryanbwork Jan 24 '13 at 2:21
    
Thanks @ryanbwork, but actually this field is already in the database that actually stores grade id for my application those ranges from 1-9, so I want to handle the value of col2 manually as sometimes we may have record with only value 2 in col2 –  Pawan Nogariya Jan 24 '13 at 2:25

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If somecondition is the same and you need sequential numbers for col2 you can do following:

INSERT INTO abc(col1, col2, col3)
SELECT col1, @n := @n + 1, col3
FROM xyz, (SELECT @n:= 0) n
WHERE somecondition

UPDATE

If your WHERE conditions applied to xyz ensures that only one row will be returned and your xyz table has more than 9 records (although you can CROSS with any other table) you can leverage CROSS JOIN AND LIMIT to replicate your row N (9 in the example) times with single INSERT-SELECT statement like this:

INSERT INTO abc(col1, col2, col3)
SELECT t1.col1, @n := @n+1, t1.col3 
  FROM xyz AS t1 CROSS JOIN xyz AS t2,(SELECT @n:= 0) n 
WHERE t1.col2=2 LIMIT 9
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Seems it is the answer I was looking for :) Let me just give it a try and I'll return and mark it as the best answer :) Thanks! –  Pawan Nogariya Jan 24 '13 at 2:58
    
@PawanNogariya Did it help? –  peterm Jan 25 '13 at 1:40
    
Didn't help :( it is inserting only one record, my actual query is this INSERT INTO assessmentperiodgrade(assessmentperiodid, gradeid) SELECT assessmentperiodid,(@n:=@n+1) AS gradeid FROM assessmentperiod, (SELECT @n:=0) n WHERE createddate=@UTCDateTimeNow AND createduser=Username; –  Pawan Nogariya Jan 25 '13 at 6:36
    
We didn't specify till when n should be incremented, can this be a reason? I want to insert 9 records –  Pawan Nogariya Jan 25 '13 at 6:37
    
@PawanNogariya How many records returned when executing this query SELECT assessmentperiodid FROM assessmentperiod WHERE createddate=@UTCDateTimeNow AND createduser=Username? –  peterm Jan 26 '13 at 1:37

You can create a stored procedure that loop into your queries like this:

CREATE PROCEDURE doiterate(p1 INT)
BEGIN
  label1: LOOP
    SET p1 = p1 + 1;
    IF p1 < 10 THEN
      ITERATE label1;
    END IF;
    LEAVE label1;
  END LOOP label1;
  SET @x = p1;
END;

I hope this might help.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks BlackHatShadow, actually I am looking for some less code than I am using currently. I just have to do nine inserts. –  Pawan Nogariya Jan 24 '13 at 2:32
    
Insert from where? is it from another table? –  Christian Mark Jan 24 '13 at 2:33

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