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In short, what's the difference?

(setq var1 `(,(get-internal-real-time)))
var1
-->(1358995178904535)
var1
-->(1358995178904535)

(setq var2 '(#.(get-internal-real-time)))
var2
-->(1358995195568422)
var2
-->(1358995195568422)

I thought that perhaps by "read-time eval" it meant that it would evaluate each time I read the variable, but I guess I was wrong, and quasiquote eval doesn't do that either.

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up vote 3 down vote accepted

An example where the difference matters:

* (defun foo () `(,(get-internal-real-time)))
FOO
* (defun bar () '(#.(get-internal-real-time)))
BAR
* (foo)
(44577)
* (foo)
(47651)
* (bar)
(41929)
* (bar)
(41929)

As you can see, when you're not using the value directly (as in the (setq var1 ...) case), the quasi-quote is expanded each time, returning different values. However, with the read-time eval, it's only called once, returning the same value again and again.

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1  
Please note that bar does call get-internal-real-time once, but it does so at read-time. This is an important detail, particularly when you're compiling files to be loaded later and when you'd expect the expression following #. to use dynamic bindings. – acelent Jan 29 '13 at 10:48

If you want to see read-time effects in isolation, using the REPL evaluating forms is not a good idea. REPL means READ EVAL PRINT LOOP. Every piece of code will be read, evaluated and print. Not just read.

Instead see this:

CL-USER > (read-from-string "`(,(get-internal-real-time))")
(LIST (GET-INTERNAL-REAL-TIME))

Above result depends a bit on the implementation, because the read version of a backquote list is not defined. But the effect is similar: the resulting form returned from the Lisp reader, is a call to LIST (or an equivalent) with the sub-form as an argument.

CL-USER > (read-from-string "'(#.(get-internal-real-time))")
(QUOTE (465370171))

Above executes the form at read-time and includes the value into the expression, which is the result of the read operation.

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"read-time eval" means, that it would be evaluated each time the code itself is read. When you enter var2 in the REPL you don't read a variable, you access its value. So, in your case both forms produce the same result.

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