Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Currently the left bar button default value is the title of the view that loaded the current one, in other words the view to be shown when the button is pressed (back button).

I want to change the text shown on the button to something else.

I tried putting the following line of code in the view controller's viewDidLoad method but it doesn't seem to work.

self.navigationItem.leftBarButtonItem.title = @"Log Out";

What should I do?

Thanks.

share|improve this question
    
Check this out, a little trick may help you to solve your problem: stackoverflow.com/a/24572572/1582255 –  rordulu Jul 4 at 10:46

24 Answers 24

up vote 224 down vote accepted

This should be placed in the method that calls the ViewController titled "NewTitle". Right before the push or popViewController statement.

UIBarButtonItem *newBackButton = 
        [[UIBarButtonItem alloc] initWithTitle:@"NewTitle" 
                                         style:UIBarButtonItemStyleBordered 
                                        target:nil 
                                        action:nil];
[[self navigationItem] setBackBarButtonItem:newBackButton];
[newBackButton release];
share|improve this answer
20  
When in the child view controller, calling this from the child view controller will not work. You have to call this from the parent view controller, while within the child view controller. –  Alex Reynolds Sep 19 '09 at 20:04
    
Alex, the answer was edited. It will work. –  Jordan Sep 19 '09 at 20:39
1  
To change the back button for my third level view controller (second push) I had to use the following line instead of the above answer: [[self.parentViewController navigationItem] setBackBarButtonItem: newBackButton]; Am I doing something wrong? –  JonB Apr 25 '10 at 12:18
3  
Jordan says he "[added] a little more clarity on where to put the code." Here is even more clarity: put it in the first (aka parent) controller, immediately before the call to push the second (aka child) controller. –  benvolioT Jan 29 '11 at 1:49
1  
You don't have to do this right before push or pop. You can do it in viewDidLoad or loadView or wherever else you set the title and other properties for this view. Victor Bogdan's answer below is clearer, IMHO. –  Joe Strout Dec 4 '13 at 20:37

in Xcode 4.5 using storyboard, by far the easiest solution i've found when the value of the Back button doesn't have to change dynamically is to use the "Back Button" field associated with the Navigation Item of the View Controller to which you want the "Back" button to say something else.

e.g. in the screenshot below, i want the Back button for the view controller(s) that i push to have "Back" as the title of the Back button.

enter image description here

of course, this won't work if you need the back button to say something slightly different each time … there are all of the other solutions here for that.

share|improve this answer
    
Same in Xcode 6 Beta 7. –  David Sep 8 at 23:32

Here is the documentation for backBarButtonItem:

"When this navigation item is immediately below the top item in the stack, the navigation controller derives the back button for the navigation bar from this navigation item. [...] If you want to specify a custom image or title for the back button, you can assign a custom bar button item (with your custom title or image) to this property instead."

View Controller A:

self.title = @"Really Long Title";
UIBarButtonItem *backButton = [[UIBarButtonItem alloc] initWithTitle:@"Short" style:UIBarButtonItemStyleBordered target:nil action:nil];
self.navigationItem.backBarButtonItem = backButton;

When any other view controller B is on top of the navigation stack, and A is right below it, B's back button will have the title "Short".

share|improve this answer
    
Good answer! But what's the purpose of this behavior? –  yar1vn Nov 8 '12 at 19:48
    
Giving a custom title to the button. –  Victor Bogdan Nov 29 '12 at 10:21

Maybe I'm being over simplistic but From Apple's documentation the wording is:

If a custom bar button item is not specified by either of the view controllers, a default back button is used and its title is set to the value of the title property of the previous view controller—that is, the view controller one level down on the stack.

The solution marked correct above sets a default button item from the parent controller. It's the right answer, but I'm solving the issue by changing self.title property of the UIViewController right before pushing the new controller onto the NavigationController stack.

This automatically updates the back button's title on the next controller, and as long as you set self.title back to what it should be in viewWillAppear I can't see this method causing too many problems.

share|improve this answer
1  
I confess to doing this as well :) –  willcodejavaforfood Feb 17 '10 at 21:22

In ChildVC this worked for me...

self.navigationController.navigationBar.topItem.title = @"Back";
share|improve this answer
    
Tested and verified on iOS 7 in Xcode 5.0.2. This WILL change the previous screen's title to Back when you go back to it though. –  Alex Zavatone Jan 17 at 17:54
    
Simpliest solution. Works on both iOS 6 and 7. Put in the base UIViewController and done. Much better than the IB solution or setting in the pushing vc. –  e_x_p Feb 26 at 10:12
4  
it changes title of previous view controller, that's the problem in this solution –  nik Mar 4 at 15:00

Ok, here is the way. If you have a view controller "first" and you navigate another view controller "second" by pushing a button or etc. you need to do some work. First you need to create a BarButtonItem in "second" view controller's ViewDidLoad method like this;

    UIBarButtonItem *btnBack = [[UIBarButtonItem alloc]
                                   initWithTitle:@"Back" 
                                   style:UIBarButtonItemStyleBordered
                                   target:self
                                   action:@selector(OnClick_btnBack:)];
    self.navigationItem.leftBarButtonItem = btnBack;
    [btnBack release];

After you do that, you need to write to code for "btnBack" action in the same .m file like this;

-(IBAction)OnClick_btnBack:(id)sender  {
      [self.navigationController popViewControllerAnimated:YES];
    //[self.navigationController pushViewController:self.navigationController.parentViewController animated:YES];
}

That's all.

share|improve this answer
2  
A leftBarButtonItem does not have the appearance of a backBarButtonItem, if that is important in the application design. –  Alex Reynolds Sep 19 '09 at 23:35
1  
Of the solutions posted (thank you very much) this one seems to work, albeit as Alex stated above, the left bar button doesn't look like a back bar item. How can I make it look like a back bar item??? –  Dale Sep 20 '09 at 1:35
    
This really worked for me ..Thanks a lot .. –  mrugen Jul 2 '11 at 9:54

This work better for me. Try :

 self.navigationController.navigationBar.topItem.backBarButtonItem = [[UIBarButtonItem alloc] 
initWithTitle:@"Back" style:UIBarButtonItemStylePlain target:nil action:nil];
share|improve this answer

I know, the question is very old, but I found a nice solution.

UIBarButtonItem *barButton = [[UIBarButtonItem alloc] init];
barButton.title = @"Custom Title";
self.navigationController.navigationBar.topItem.backBarButtonItem = barButton;

Works from childView! Tested with iOS 7.

share|improve this answer
    
this works for me in iOS 7 :) –  Nhon Nguyen Aug 14 at 8:05

self.navigationController.navigationBar.backItem.title = @"TEXT";

share|improve this answer
    
It does not work for me. –  tangqiaoboy Jun 1 '12 at 12:26
10  
It works for none –  itechnician Aug 28 '12 at 5:36
UIBarButtonItem *btnBack = [[UIBarButtonItem alloc]
                                   initWithTitle:@"Back" 
                                   style:UIBarButtonItemStyleBordered
                                   target:self
                                   action:@selector(OnClick_btnBack:)];
    self.navigationItem.leftBarButtonItem = btnBack;
    [btnBack release];
share|improve this answer

For those using storyboards just select the parent (not the one that is holding target view) view controller frame (be sure you click right on the Navigation bar, then open attributes inspector, where you'll find three form inputs. The third one "back button" is that we are looking for.

share|improve this answer
    
just saw your answer after i posted mine with the screenshot. –  john.k.doe Dec 10 '12 at 1:47
1  
this is the best solution if you don't care about localization. –  MiQUEL May 24 '13 at 23:44

Here is the answer:

In viewDidAppear:animated (NOT in viewDidLoad) do the following

- (void)viewDidAppear:(BOOL)animated
{
     [self.navigationController.navigationBar.backItem setTitle:@"anything"];

     // then call the super
     [super viewDidAppear:animated];
}

That if you want to keep the shape of the back button.

share|improve this answer
1  
Fantastic! This is the solution for me in both iOS 6 and iOS 7. –  Seth Jan 4 at 15:45
    
Not bad except that they can see it change titles. I tried in viewWillAppear and it doesn't work. –  Travis M. Jun 13 at 17:02

Here's another way to do it.

In your parent view controller, implement the following method:

- (void) setBackBarButtonItemTitle:(NSString *)newTitle {
  self.navigationItem.backBarButtonItem.title = newTitle;
}

In your child view controller, when you want to change the title, this will work:

NSArray *viewControllerArray = [self.navigationController viewControllers];
int parentViewControllerIndex = [viewControllerArray count] - 2;
[[viewControllerArray objectAtIndex:parentViewControllerIndex] setBackBarButtonItemTitle:@"New Title"];

I was never able to get the parentViewController property to work:

[(ParentViewController *)(self.navigationController.parentViewController) setBackBarButtonItemTitle:@"New Title"];

I don't know if that's a bug or I'm not using it properly. But grabbing the second-to-last view controller in the viewControllers array points to the parent view controller, and I can call parent methods correctly with that reference.

share|improve this answer
self.navigationItem.backBarButtonItem = [[[UIBarButtonItem alloc] 
                                              initWithTitle:@"Log out" 
                                              style:UIBarButtonItemStyleDone 
                                              target:nil 
                                              action:nil] autorelease];

you can put it whereever you like in the code in the parrent controller, which allowes you to have differenct backbuttons for different child views.

share|improve this answer

I've found, that the easiest way to change the name of the back button is to set the view controllers title to the title of the back button, and then replacing the titleView in the view controllers navigation item to a custom label with it's real name.

Like this:

CustomViewController.m

@implementation CustomViewController

- (NSString*)title {
    return @"Back Button Title";
}

- (void)viewDidLoad {
    [super viewDidLoad];
    UILabel* customTitleView = [[UILabel alloc] initWithFrame:CGRectZero];
    customTitleView.text = @"Navigation Bar Title";
    customTitleView.font = [UIFont boldSystemFontOfSize:20];
    customTitleView.backgroundColor = [UIColor clearColor];
    customTitleView.textColor = [UIColor whiteColor];
    customTitleView.shadowColor = [UIColor colorWithRed:0.0 green:0.0 blue:0.0 alpha:0.5];
    customTitleView.shadowOffset = CGSizeMake(0, -1);

    [customTitleView sizeToFit];

    self.navigationItem.titleView = [customTitleView autorelease];
}

@end

This will make your title in UINavigationBar look as if it was native. Giving the view controller the ability to have seperated title and back button title.

In the case of view controller A and B, A is responsible for telling how it's back button should look, while B is displayed.

EDIT: This also maintains the back button native look (The left arrowed bar button item).

share|improve this answer

ok. I personally hated all of these options. Therefore I came up with my own.

Based on the information I have seen. It appears that the Previous view controller is in control of its own "Back" button that will be presented on the pushed view controller.

I have created a Lazy Load method for the navigationItem on the controller that wants the changed Back Button.

Mine is an Invite Buyer Controller

Invite Buyer is the text that is set by default.

but the back button needed to be Invite

Here is the code that I used to create the back button.

I placed this code in the top of the Controller's Implementatio (.m) file and it overrode the super's method automatically.

- (UINavigationItem *)navigationItem{
    UINavigationItem *item = [super navigationItem];
    if (item != nil && item.backBarButtonItem == nil)
    {
        item.backBarButtonItem = [[[UIBarButtonItem alloc] init] autorelease];
        item.backBarButtonItem.title = @"Invite";
    }

    return item;
}

I feel this is a much more elegant way to accomplish this.

I place this code in one place, and it automatically gets populated when needed.

No need to call the code before each push request.

Hope this helps

share|improve this answer

Most of solutions kills the original style of BackButton (The left arrowed bar button) while adding a usual button with desired title.
So to keep the original style there are 2 ways:
1st: To use undocumented button style (110 or something like that) which I prefer not to do. But if you want you could find how to do it here, on stackoverflow.
2nd: To use I the Trenskow's idea. I liked it and I use it a bit changed.
Instead of overriding - (NSString*)title I've decided to keep the original title in the following way (which allows me to use nib's titles as well as given title at push state btw).

- (void)viewDidLoad {
    [super viewDidLoad];
    static NSString * backButtonTitle=@"Back"; //or whatever u want

    if (![self.title isEqualToString:backButtonTitle]){

        UILabel* customTitleView = [[UILabel alloc] initWithFrame:CGRectZero];
        customTitleView.text = self.title; // original title
        customTitleView.font = [UIFont boldSystemFontOfSize:20];
        customTitleView.backgroundColor = [UIColor clearColor];
        customTitleView.textColor = [UIColor whiteColor];
        customTitleView.shadowColor = [UIColor colorWithRed:0.0 green:0.0 blue:0.0 alpha:0.5];
        customTitleView.shadowOffset = CGSizeMake(0, -1);

        [customTitleView sizeToFit];

        self.navigationItem.titleView = [customTitleView autorelease];
        self.title = backButtonTitle; 
    }
}

This solution works good and it looks native. Also if use it in the viewDidLoad method it prevents execution more then 1 time.
Also I've tried a Jessedc's solution but it looks bad. It causes visible to user title bar change on the fly from original to BackButton's desired and back.

share|improve this answer

Stan's answer was the best one. But it also have a problem, when you use the controller with a Tab Bar and change the controller's title, you could change the Tab Bar's title too.So the best answer is change the view_controller.navigationItem.title only and use the view_controller.navigationItem.title in the function. Answer is here:(With ARC and add them into view's viewDidLoad)

  static NSString * back_button_title=@"Back"; //or whatever u want
  if (![view_controller.navigationItem.title isEqualToString:back_button_title]){
    UILabel* custom_title_view = [[UILabel alloc] initWithFrame:CGRectZero];
    custom_title_view.text = view_controller.navigationItem.title; // original title
    custom_title_view.font = [UIFont boldSystemFontOfSize:20];
    custom_title_view.backgroundColor = [UIColor clearColor];
    custom_title_view.textColor = [UIColor whiteColor];
    custom_title_view.shadowColor = [UIColor colorWithRed:0.0 green:0.0 blue:0.0 alpha:0.5];
    custom_title_view.shadowOffset = CGSizeMake(0, -1);

    [custom_title_view sizeToFit];

    view_controller.navigationItem.titleView = custom_title_view;
    view_controller.navigationItem.title = back_button_title;
  }

In myself use, I make it a function like this, just have the feature with one line code in the viewDidLoad.

+ (void)makeSubViewHaveBackButton:(UIViewController*) view_controller{
  static NSString * back_button_title=@"Back"; //or whatever u want
  if (![view_controller.navigationItem.title isEqualToString:back_button_title]){
    UILabel* custom_title_view = [[UILabel alloc] initWithFrame:CGRectZero];
    custom_title_view.text = view_controller.navigationItem.title; // original title
    custom_title_view.font = [UIFont boldSystemFontOfSize:20];
    custom_title_view.backgroundColor = [UIColor clearColor];
    custom_title_view.textColor = [UIColor whiteColor];
    custom_title_view.shadowColor = [UIColor colorWithRed:0.0 green:0.0 blue:0.0 alpha:0.5];
    custom_title_view.shadowOffset = CGSizeMake(0, -1);

    [custom_title_view sizeToFit];

    view_controller.navigationItem.titleView = custom_title_view;
    view_controller.navigationItem.title = back_button_title;
  }
}
share|improve this answer

If you want not only to change the text of the Back button to the same text and remain the original left-arrow shape, but also to do something when user clicks the Back button, I recommend you to have a look around my "CustomNavigationController".

share|improve this answer

This works for me as a "simplified" version of previous posted answers.

UIBarButtonItem *backButton = [[UIBarButtonItem alloc] init];

backButton.title = @"Go Back";

self.navigationItem.backBarButtonItem = backButton;

Remember to put the code inside the parent view controller (e.g. the view that has your table view or UITableViewController), not the child or detail view (e.g. UIViewController).

You can easily localize the back button string like this:

backButton.title = NSLocalizedString(@"Back Title", nil);
share|improve this answer

It seems that the navigation controller looks for

previousViewController.navigationItem.title

If nothing there it looks for

previousViewController.title
share|improve this answer

In Swift/iOS8, the following worked for me:

let backButton = UIBarButtonItem(
      title: "Back Button Text",
      style: UIBarButtonItemStyle.Bordered,
      target: nil,
      action: nil
);

self.navigationController.navigationBar.topItem.backBarButtonItem = backButton;

Ported from Felipe's answer.

share|improve this answer

Set a backBarButtonItem to the navigationItem of the previous viewController.

UINavigationController *nav = self.navigationController;
if (nav != nil) {
    nav.navigationBar.backItem.backBarButtonItem =[[UIBarButtonItem alloc]
                                                   initWithTitle:backButtonTitle
                                                   style:UIBarButtonItemStylePlain
                                                   target:self
                                                   action:nil];
}
share|improve this answer

You actually want to be using the "backBarButtonItem" property.

And it behaves strangely. If you have ViewController "A", and ViewController "B", then when you navigate to "B", the back button says "A". If you want it to say "Previous" instead, you don't put the code inside B's ViewController. Instead, you put it inside A's controller. The self.navigationItem.backBarButtonItem refers to the back button that would take you to this view controller (self).

So inside your "A" controller, you'd put:

self.navigationItem.backBarButtonItem.title = @"Previous";

It's weird.

share|improve this answer
    
Didn't work for me. :-( –  Dale Sep 20 '09 at 1:34
    
Didn't work for me wither :x –  Ansari Apr 7 '11 at 11:15
    
2 years later, didn't work for me either. –  kubilay Oct 4 '11 at 11:24
    
Not worked for me :) –  Govind P N Feb 8 '13 at 9:56

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.