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I'm looking for ideas on how to optimize the following code which is the body of a for loop:

final BitmapFactory.Options options = new BitmapFactory.Options();
options.inSampleSize = 4;
options.inJustDecodeBounds = false;
ImageButton view = new ImageButton(this);
view.setBackgroundColor(0);
view.setOnClickListener(new OnClickListener(){
@Override
public void onClick(View v) {
     finalThis.onBorderClicked(v);
}
});
view.setTag(i); //i is the loop counter

Bitmap big = BitmapFactory.decodeResource(getResources(), borders[i], options);
Bitmap smaller = Bitmap.createScaledBitmap(big, borderDimension, borderDimension, false);

view.setImageBitmap(smaller);

view.setLayoutParams(new LinearLayout.LayoutParams(LayoutParams.WRAP_CONTENT, LayoutParams.FILL_PARENT));
((LinearLayout.LayoutParams)view.getLayoutParams()).setMargins(0, 0, -5, 0);
group.addView(view);

big.recycle();

Basically I've got images that are 600x600 and I want to get them to size of around 50dp. So naturally, I first set the sample size to 4 (600 / 4 = 150), so that I don't occupy unnecessary memory and then further resize the image down to the specified size. I then use it to load it onto an ImageButton, and also I recycle the bigger, now useless Bitmap.

This is a dynamic UI creation code, the ImageButtons are added to a HorizontalScrollView. Thing is, in one case, I've got to add more than hundred ImageButtons to the UI and this code is awfully slow.

The question is: how can I make it work faster? It is currently executed on the MainActivity, could multithreading (perhaps AsyncTask) help in this instance? And is there any other way that would possibly be faster for getting the Bitmaps to the desired size? If there is no way to make this process significantly faster, then is there a way to progressively add the ImageButtons one by one (but in the same order) so that the UI is not frozen when all of this happens?

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up vote 1 down vote accepted

Taking your code off the main thread will not make the application process the images any faster, but it will keep the UI responsive to the user while that process is taking place and is absolutely a necessary step when you have this much data to load at once. However, keep in mind that you cannot manipulate the view hierarchy from any thread other than the main thread, so you cannot just place this whole operation inside of an AsyncTask.doInBackground(). You will have to split out the lines that take the most time (i.e. your decodeResource() and createScaledBitmap() calls), but the code to instantiate and add views to the parent will need to happen in onPostExecute() or publishProgress() (depending on how you implement the task logic).

Thing is, in one case, I've got to add more than hundred ImageButtons to the UI and this code is awfully slow.

Another important thing to keep in mind is that having upwards of 100 image-based views in your hierarchy at any one time is still a large chunk wasted memory. The best way to speed up the process is not to add all the views at once, but only add them as they are needed (i.e. when the user scrolls over) and then remove/recycle views that are no longer on screen. This is how AdapterView implementations work for this very reason, use only the memory you need and your app will be both faster and more efficient.

I realize there is no HorizontalListView in the framework, but there are 3rd party implementations that provide this functionality for you, or you can look at the source for one of the framework classes to build your own from.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. I currently don't mind the memory the images take, and the general idea works well. The solution was to subclass AsyncTask, move the loop in doInBackground() and call publishProgress() for each element that is being added. This doesn't freeze up the UI and adds elements one by one, just like I wanted. – user1114055 Jan 24 '13 at 5:10

You don't need to scale the image by yourself. You can do this by the asking the ImageButton to scale for you, which is much faster.

ImageButton view = new ImageButton(this);
view.setBackgroundColor(0);
view.setOnClickListener(new OnClickListener(){
@Override
public void onClick(View v) {
     finalThis.onBorderClicked(v);
}
});
view.setTag(i); //i is the loop counter

view.setAdjustViewBounds(true);
view.setMaxHeight(borderDimension);
view.setMaxWidth(borderDimension);
view.setImageResource(border[i]);

view.setLayoutParams(new LinearLayout.LayoutParams(LayoutParams.WRAP_CONTENT, LayoutParams.WRAP_CONTENT));
((LinearLayout.LayoutParams)view.getLayoutParams()).setMargins(0, 0, -5, 0);
group.addView(view);

I have changed the layout params to use WRAP_CONTENT for height, because I do not know how does your image look like. You can play around with the layout a bit, but this generally should do the trick.

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Given the number of elements I put, this code quickly results in an OutOfMemoryException. – user1114055 Jan 24 '13 at 4:03

I found a good solution at http://developer.android.com/training/displaying-bitmaps/index.html

It has following code, which dynamically set Bitmap to ImageView.

class BitmapWorkerTask extends AsyncTask<Integer, Void, Bitmap> {
    private final WeakReference<ImageView> imageViewReference;
    private int data = 0;

public BitmapWorkerTask(ImageView imageView) {
    // Use a WeakReference to ensure the ImageView can be garbage collected
    imageViewReference = new WeakReference<ImageView>(imageView);
}

// Decode image in background.
@Override
protected Bitmap doInBackground(Integer... params) {
    data = params[0];
    return decodeSampledBitmapFromResource(getResources(), data, 100, 100));
}

// Once complete, see if ImageView is still around and set bitmap.
@Override
protected void onPostExecute(Bitmap bitmap) {
    if (imageViewReference != null && bitmap != null) {
        final ImageView imageView = imageViewReference.get();
        if (imageView != null) {
            imageView.setImageBitmap(bitmap);
        }
    }
}
}

You can call this by using,

public void loadBitmap(int resId, ImageView imageView) {
    BitmapWorkerTask task = new BitmapWorkerTask(imageView);
    task.execute(resId);
}

Here, just change ImageView to ImageButton.

Edit:

public static Bitmap decodeSampledBitmapFromResource(Resources res, int resId,
    int reqWidth, int reqHeight) {

    // First decode with inJustDecodeBounds=true to check dimensions
    final BitmapFactory.Options options = new BitmapFactory.Options();
    options.inJustDecodeBounds = true;
    BitmapFactory.decodeResource(res, resId, options);

    // Calculate inSampleSize
    options.inSampleSize = 4;

    // Decode bitmap with inSampleSize set
    options.inJustDecodeBounds = false;
    return BitmapFactory.decodeResource(res, resId, options);
}

You can find more about handling Bitmaps Efficiently here

share|improve this answer
    
This works with one ImageView, but OP is creating hundreds of it. – Lawrence Choy Jan 24 '13 at 3:47
    
You can create an HashMap or Array of your ImageButton and resources. Loop around and will work. – Chintan Rathod Jan 24 '13 at 3:49
    
@ChintanRathod Where is the declaration and implementation of decodeSampledBitmapFromResource? This is basically the same thing I do, just in an AsyncTask. – user1114055 Jan 24 '13 at 3:51
    
The code you have already written in your question is the method. See my updated answer. – Chintan Rathod Jan 24 '13 at 3:53

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