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I'd like to print (or send to a file in a human-readable format like below) arbitrary size square tables where each table cell contains the number of steps required to solve Euclid's algorithm for the two integers in the row/column headings like this (table written by hand, but I think the numbers are all correct):

  1  2  3  4  5  6
1 1  1  1  1  1  1 
2 1  1  2  1  2  1
3 1  2  1  2  3  1
4 1  1  2  1  2  2
5 1  2  3  2  1  2
6 1  1  1  2  2  1

The script would ideally allow me to choose the start integer (1 as above or 11 as below or something else arbitrary) and end integer (6 as above or 16 as below or something else arbitrary and larger than the start integer), so that I could do this too:

   11 12 13 14 15 16
11  1  2  3  4  4  3
12  2  1  2  2  2  2
13  3  2  1  2  3  3
14  4  2  2  1  2  2
15  4  2  3  2  1  2
16  3  2  3  2  2  1

I realize that the table is symmetric about the diagonal and so only half of the table contains unique information, and that the diagonal itself is always a 1-step algorithm.

See this and number of steps required to solve Euclid's algorithmfor a graphical representation of what I'm after, but I'd like to know the actual number of steps for any two integers which the image doesn't show me.

I have the algorithms (there's probably better implementations, but I think these work):

The step counter:

def gcd(a,b):
    """Step counter."""
    if b > a:
        x = a
        a = b
        b = x
    counter = 0
    while b:
        c = a % b
        a = b
        b = c
        counter += 1
    return counter

The list builder:

def gcd_steps(n):
    """List builder."""
    print("Table of size", n - 1, "x", n - 1)
    list_of_steps = []
    for i in range(1, n):
        for j in range(1, n):
            list_of_steps.append(gcd(i,j))
    print(list_of_steps)
    return list_of_steps

but I'm totally hung up on how to write the table. I thought about a double nested for loop with i and j and stuff, but I'm new to Python and haven't a clue about the best way (or any way) to go about writing the table. I don't need special formatting like something to offset the row/column heads from the table cells as I can do that by eye, but just getting everything to line up so that I can read it easily is proving too difficult for me at my current skill level, I'm afraid. I'm thinking that it probably makes sense to print/output within the two nested for loops as I'm calculating the numbers I need which is why the list builder has some print statements as well as returning the list, but I don't know how to work the print magic to do what I'm after.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Try this. The programs computes data row by row and prints each row when it's available, in order to limit memory usage.

import sys, os

def gcd(a,b):
   k = 0
   if b > a:
      a, b = b, a
   while b > 0:
      a, b = b, a%b
      k += 1
   return k

def printgcd(name, a, b):
   f = open(name, "wt")
   s = ""
   for i in range(a, b + 1):
      s = "{}\t{}".format(s, i)
   f.write("{}\n".format(s))
   for i in range(a, b + 1):
      s = "{}".format(i)
      for j in range (a, b + 1):
         s = "{}\t{}".format(s, gcd(i, j))
      f.write("{}\n".format(s))
   f.close()

printgcd("gcd-1-6.txt", 1, 6)

The preceding won't return a list with all computed values, since they are destroyed on purpose. It's easy to do however. Here is a solution with a hash table

def printgcd2(name, a, b):
   f = open(name, "wt")
   s = ""
   h = { }
   for i in range(a, b + 1):
      s = "{}\t{}".format(s, i)
   f.write("{}\n".format(s))
   for i in range(a, b + 1):
      s = "{}".format(i)
      for j in range (a, b + 1):
         k = gcd(i, j)
         s = "{}\t{}".format(s, k)
         h[i, j] = k
      f.write("{}\n".format(s))
   f.close()
   return h

And here is another with a list of lists

def printgcd3(name, a, b):
   f = open(name, "wt")
   s = ""
   u = [ ]
   for i in range(a, b + 1):
      s = "{}\t{}".format(s, i)
   f.write("{}\n".format(s))
   for i in range(a, b + 1):
      v = [ ]
      s = "{}".format(i)
      for j in range (a, b + 1):
         k = gcd(i, j)
         s = "{}\t{}".format(s, k)
         v.append(k)
      f.write("{}\n".format(s))
      u.append(v)
   f.close()
   return u
share|improve this answer
    
Very slick! I've been toying with this for hours today! Not only does it answer the question and solve the problem, but the code is very educational for a beginner like me. Thanks very much! –  02019 Jan 24 '13 at 20:43
    
You may have noted I tend to use a bit too much the notation "{}".format(). In some cases, you could just do s+"\n", or str(i). It's shorter, but I have taken the (bad?) habit to always use format... –  Jean-Claude Arbaut Jan 25 '13 at 7:06

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