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This remainder operation (modulo) in Python 3.0 is quite confusing. (%)

In python, if I wanted to ask:

9 % 5 = 4

But if I ask,

-9 % 5 = 1

Why is the answer '1'? and not '-4'?

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2  
This wikipedia article on Modular arithmetic should clear it up –  elssar Jan 24 '13 at 5:11

4 Answers 4

Because in python, the sign matches the denominator.

>>> 9 % -5
-1
>>> -9 % 5
1

For an explanation of why it was implemented this way, read the blog post by Guido.

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ooops sry i meant why is the answer 1 and not -4? –  user1864828 Jan 24 '13 at 4:57

-10 % 5 is 0, ie, -10 is evenly divided by 5.

You ask why -9 % 5 is not -4, and the answer is that both 1 and -4 can be correct answers, it depends on what -9 divided by 5 is. Of course -9 divided by 5 is 1.8, but this is integer division, in Python 3 represented by //, so I'll use // here to be clear that it's integer division we are talking about.

I'll explain this by not using negative numbers, it's easier.

9 // 5 is 1. Ie, you can subtract 5 from 9 only 1 time, and the rest is 4. But if you subtract 5 from 9 one more time, well, then the rest becomes -1!

So -1 is a correct answer to 9 % 5, if 9 // 5 is 2.

In Python 9 // 5 is 1, because the Python integer division is a floor division, ie it always rounds down. If it has rounded up 9 // 5 would be two, and 9 % 5 would have been -1.

Now lets look at the case when we use negative numbers: -9 divided by 5 is now -2. Because it is floor division, it always rounds down. That means that the rest is 1. So -9 % 5 is 1, not -4.

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This really has to do with how python rounds integer division.

Mathematically, the following has to be true always for any int x and y

x == (x // y) * y + x % y

So from this, we can say

x % y == x - (x // y) * y

Now recall that python rounds integer divison toward negative infinity, not toward zero. For example -9 // 5 gives -2, not -1. With this logic, you obtain -9 % 5 = 1

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Think about it like this:

0 % 5 is 0

1 % 5 is 1

So... what if you go backwards?

-1 % 5 must be 4

-2 % 5 must be 3

and so on.

You'll see that following this -9 % 5 is 1

NOTE: Depending on the programming language and the implementation of %, you might get different results since programmers disagree on how to handle negative numbers in %

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maybe i have this understanding of % all wrong. if x%y, doesnt that represent the remainder after x has been divided into y? –  user1864828 Jan 24 '13 at 5:02
    
It represents something slightly different, but incredibly useful. Basically, it allows you to mod numbers and consider them to be in ranges of 0 to n-1 even when they go negative. The link wim posted gives an example of why you might want this: python-history.blogspot.com.au/2010/08/… –  Patashu Jan 24 '13 at 5:08
    
could you explain why 3%7 is 3. i mean by my logic up there, 3 is the remainder after 3 has been divided into 7?? im confused :( –  user1864828 Jan 24 '13 at 5:25
    
Yes, 3%7 is 3. And 0%7 is 0, and -1%7 is 6 - because 6%7 is also 6, and (m+a*n)%n always equals m%n for any positive or negative integer a. (e.g. you can subtract or add 7 and still get the same remainder) –  Patashu Jan 24 '13 at 5:29

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