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This is the error message: PLS-00428: an INTO clause is expected in this SELECT statement. Meanwhile, this is the procedure for testing displaying the system date:

CREATE OR REPLACE 
PROCEDURE "TEST_PROCEDURE"
AS
BEGIN
    SELECT SYSDATE FROM DUAL;
END;

In the first place I don't need to use that INTO Oracle is insisting for me to do. Is there other way around beside using a cursor (I've seen it here http://stackoverflow.com/a/6029963/1983024)? I think it should not be like that, this does run normally just like in MS SQL without using INTO or cursor.

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Are you using this as a trigger? –  Christian Mark Jan 24 '13 at 6:07
    
No sir, everything is fresh (no tables, no triggers, no sequence, etc. yet), I am just testing the procedures here. –  nathan742 Jan 24 '13 at 6:11
    
Oracle does not work this way, like MS SQL. The procedure can't just spit content of a Table into SQL*Plus result panel –  cha Jan 24 '13 at 6:12
    
Thanks @cha for the info however, what would you suggest? Besides, I am not pointing here of a table yet, I am just executing a system function. –  nathan742 Jan 24 '13 at 6:14
1  
if your object is just to compile the procedure, declare a variable and store SYSDATE there. If you want to display in SQL*Plus then use the solution provided in your link. –  cha Jan 24 '13 at 6:18

5 Answers 5

In the first place I don't need to use that INTO Oracle is insisting for me to do.

The fact is, Oracle is correct: you do need to use an INTO to take the return value.

After all, if you want to display the result of the query you're going to need a variable to put it in first.

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I'm sorry, I just don't really need it in this situation, I am referring to what MS SQL can simply do in selecting a certain value then displaying it just it is and comparing it on how Oracle does it. Thanks for the info, though. –  nathan742 Jan 24 '13 at 6:54
    
Well, you did say you wanted to "display" the system date, so, yes, you really do need it! :) –  Jeffrey Kemp Jan 24 '13 at 6:58

you can write

CREATE OR REPLACE 
PROCEDURE "TEST_PROCEDURE"
AS
BEGIN
for r_row in ( SELECT SYSDATE s FROM DUAL)
  dbms_output.put_line(r_row.s);
end loop;
END;

or you have to have a variable.

CREATE OR REPLACE 
PROCEDURE "TEST_PROCEDURE"
AS
  v_Date date;
BEGIN
    SELECT SYSDATE into v_date FROM DUAL;
  dbms_output.put_line(v_date );

END;

output format is dictated by your NLS_DATE_FORMAT setting, or you can be explicit like to_char(v_date, 'dd-mm-yyyy') etc.

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+1 for including the loop option. My situation required a loop. –  xdhmoore Mar 21 '13 at 17:33
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Finally found a solution to the output I want (based on your responses) :D

CREATE OR REPLACE 
PROCEDURE "TEST_PROCEDURE"
RET_DATE CHAR(10);
BEGIN
    SELECT TO_CHAR(SYSDATE, 'MM/DD/YYYY') INTO RET_DATE FROM DUAL;
    DBMS_OUTPUT.PUT_LINE(RET_DATE);
END;

This displays the SYSDATE with format of MM/DD/YYYY. Still, thanks for the replies and ideas (mostly @Jeffrey Kemp). Oracle just lengthens what MS SQL can normally do in one line :D

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You can use like

CREATE OR replace PROCEDURE Test_procedure
IS
  date CHAR(10);
BEGIN
    SELECT To_char(SYSDATE, 'MM/DD/YYYY')
    INTO   date
    FROM   dual;

    dbms_output.Put_line(date);
END; 

it will return date into char format.

If you want to get date into date format just declare the date type variable then assign the sysdate value INTO that variable.Then use DBMS_OUTPUT.PUT_LINE(variable) to print the DATE.

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If you wanted to do it in one line, you could also use:

CREATE OR replace PROCEDURE Test_procedure
IS
BEGIN
  dbms_output.put_line(to_char(sysdate, 'MM/DD/YY'));
END;
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