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Given these two matrices:

m1 = [ 1 1;
       2 2;
       3 3;
       4 4;
       5 5 ];

m2 = [ 4 2;
       1 1;
       4 4;
       7 5 ];

I'm looking for a function, such as:

indices = GetIntersectionIndecies (m1,m2);

That the output of which will be

indices = 
          1
          0
          0
          1
          0

How can I find the intersection indices of rows between these two matrices without using a loop ?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

One possible solution:

function [Index] = GetIntersectionIndicies(m1, m2)
[~, I1] = intersect(m1, m2, 'rows');
Index = zeros(size(m1, 1), 1);
Index(I1) = 1;

By the way, I love the inventive solution of @Shai, and it is much faster than my solution if your matrices are small. But if your matrices are large, then my solution will dominate. This is because if we set T = size(m1, 1), then the tmp variable in the answer of @Shai will be T*T, ie a very large matrix if T is large. Here's some code for a quick speed test:

%# Set parameters
T = 1000;
M = 10;

%# Build test matrices
m1 = randi(5, T, 2);
m2 = randi(5, T, 2);

%# My solution
tic
for m = 1:M
[~, I1] = intersect(m1, m2, 'rows');
Index = zeros(size(m1, 1), 1);
Index(I1) = 1;
end
toc

%# @Shai solution
tic
for m = 1:M
tmp = bsxfun( @eq, permute( m1, [ 1 3 2 ] ), permute( m2, [ 3 1 2 ] ) );
tmp = all( tmp, 3 ); % tmp(i,j) is true iff m1(i,:) == m2(j,:)
imdices = any( tmp, 2 );
end
toc

Set T = 10 and M = 1000, and we get:

Elapsed time is 0.404726 seconds. %# My solution
Elapsed time is 0.017669 seconds. %# @Shai solution

But set T = 1000 and M = 100 and we get:

Elapsed time is 0.068831 seconds. %# My solution
Elapsed time is 0.508370 seconds. %# @Shai solution
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blah. just typed this too... +1 –  natan Jan 24 '13 at 6:33
    
Too fast answer to be able to accept :D –  Sameh Kamal Jan 24 '13 at 6:38
1  
@SamehKamal I just updated my answer to include a speed test, demonstrating the circumstances under which my solution will prove optimal relative to the solution of Shai. –  Colin T Bowers Jan 24 '13 at 6:56
    
@natan Sorry :-) Thanks for the validation though... –  Colin T Bowers Jan 24 '13 at 7:00
    
no you were right, when I wrote the code I used [~,I1,~]=intersect(m1,m2,...) , but at your original code you used intersect(m2,m1,...) so the proper location of the output is [~,~,I1]... my bad for not noticing that. Besides that, I wish these answers will always come so quickly and well articulated in SO... –  natan Jan 24 '13 at 7:07

How about using bsxfun

function indices = GetIntersectionIndecies( m1, m2 )
    tmp = bsxfun( @eq, permute( m1, [ 1 3 2 ] ), permute( m2, [ 3 1 2 ] ) );
    tmp = all( tmp, 3 ); % tmp(i,j) is true iff m1(i,:) == m2(j,:)
    indices = any( tmp, 2 );
end

Cheers!

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Please, Can you put your code in the form of function indecis = GetIntersectionIndecies(m1,m2) –  Sameh Kamal Jan 24 '13 at 6:33
    
What a fascinating solution! +1 –  Colin T Bowers Jan 24 '13 at 6:36
1  
I just did a quick speed test, and your solution works great if size(m1, 1) is small, but suffers as the size of the matrices increases, since tmp gets very large. But still, a very creative solution! –  Colin T Bowers Jan 24 '13 at 6:55

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