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I'm trying to calculate the following value:

1/N * sum[i=0 to N-1]( log(abs(r_i - 2 * r_i * x_i)) )

where x_i is recursively calculated with:

x_{i+1} = r_i * x_i * (1 - x_i)

Where all the r_is are given (although they change with i), and x_0 is given. (As far as I can tell there is no tricky mathematical way to simplify this calculation to a non-iterative formula to speed it up like that).

My problem is that it is very slow, and I wonder if some outside perspective could help me speed it up.

# x0: a scalar. rs: a numeric vector, length N
# N: typically ~5000
f <- function (x0, rs, N) {
    lambda <- 0                                                                 
    x <- x0                                                                     
    for (i in 1:N) {                                                            
        r <- rs[i]                                                              
        rx <- r * x                                                             
        lambda <- lambda + log(abs(r - 2 * rx))                                 
        # calculate the next x value
        x <- rx - rx * x                                                        
    }                                                                           
    return(lambda / N)                                                          
}

Now on its own this function is decently fast, but I would like to be calling it ~ 4,000,000 times (once for each cell in a 2000 by 2000 matrix), each with a different rs vector.

But if I call it even just 2500 times (with N=1000), it takes ~25 seconds, with the following profile:

      self.time self.pct total.time total.pct
"f"       19.98    81.22      24.60    100.00
"*"        2.00     8.13       2.00      8.13
"-"        1.32     5.37       1.32      5.37
"+"        0.70     2.85       0.70      2.85
"abs"      0.56     2.28       0.56      2.28
":"        0.04     0.16       0.04      0.16

Does anyone know how I might speed this up? Looks like multiplication takes a while, but I've already pre-cached any multiplication that is repeated.

I also tried taking advantage that sum( log(stuff(i)) ) is the same as log(prod(stuff(i)) to reduce the calls to log and abs, but this turned out unfeasable as stuff was a vector of length N (in the thousands) and typical values at least 1, so prod(stuff) ended up being Inf to R.

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1 Answer 1

In my opinion, the bottleneck is the for loop in your function.

I rewrite it with Rcpp as follow:

# x0: a scalar. rs: a numeric vector, length N
# N: typically ~5000
x0 <- runif(1)
N <- 5000
rs <- rnorm(5000)
f <- function (x0, rs, N) {
    lambda <- 0                                                                 
    x <- x0                                                                     
    for (i in 1:N) {                                                            
        r <- rs[i]                                                              
        rx <- r * x                                                             
        lambda <- lambda + log(abs(r - 2 * rx))                                 
        # calculate the next x value
        x <- rx - rx * x                                                        
    }                                                                           
    return(lambda / N)                                                          
}

library(inline)
library(Rcpp)
f1 <- cxxfunction(sig=c(Rx0="numeric", Rrs="numeric"), plugin="Rcpp", body='
  double x0 = as<double>(Rx0);
  NumericVector rs(Rrs);
  int N = rs.size();
  double lambda = 0, x = x0, r, rx;
  for(int i = 0;i < N;i++) {
    r = rs[i];
    rx = r * x;
    lambda = lambda + log( fabs(r - 2 * rx) );
    x = rx - rx * x;
  }
  lambda /= N;
  return wrap(lambda);
  ')
f(x0, rs, N)
f1(x0, rs)

library(rbenchmark)

benchmark(f(x0, rs, N), f1(x0, rs))

f1 is 140 times faster than f on my last test.

share|improve this answer
    
Ahhh, Rcpp, I should really start learning you...cheers! –  mathematical.coffee Jan 24 '13 at 23:58

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