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Hi I have the following table of data

Class | Member | Value
----------------------
c1    | m1     | 10
c1    | m2     | 20
c1    | list   | 30
c1    | list   | 40
c1    | list   | 50
c2    | m1     | 60
c2    | m2     | 70
c2    | list   | 80

and would like to pivot the data into this form

Class | Member 1 | Member 2 | List
----------------------------------
c1    | 10       | 20       | 30
c1    | 10       | 20       | 40
c1    | 10       | 20       | 50
c2    | 60       | 70       | 80

a normal pivot using max as the aggregate function would have given me

Class | Member 1 | Member 2 | List
----------------------------------
c1    | 10       | 20       | 50
c2    | 60       | 70       | 80

but I want each of the List values of any Class to be listed out.

Instead of finding alternatives by writing SQL queries full of CASEes e.g CASE Member WHEN 'm1' then Value, CASE Member WHEN 'm2' then Value, ... to achieve what I want, I want to know if there is any chance to use pivot with some tweaks to make it work for my task?

The database is SQL 2008 R2

Thank you

share|improve this question
    
Are there only ever one (and exactly one) row of m1 and m2 for each Class value? –  Damien_The_Unbeliever Jan 24 '13 at 7:30
    
Yes, the members are fixed to m1, m2, ..., m99 and list. Using PIVOT help me not to write 100 CASEes nor JOINs for each of them. –  user1589188 Jan 24 '13 at 8:04

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

No. PIVOT is effectively syntactic sugar for doing aggregates around CASE expressions. If the sugar doesn't work, you need to go back to the longer form.

The syntax for PIVOT is fully described in the FROM clause:

<pivoted_table> ::=
    table_source PIVOT <pivot_clause> [ AS ] table_alias

<pivot_clause> ::=
        ( aggregate_function ( value_column [ [ , ]...n ]) 
        FOR pivot_column 
        IN ( <column_list> ) 
    ) 

And note that aggregate_function must be provided. All aggregate functions in SQL Server operate on any number of input values and produce a single output value. There's no aggregate which can produce multiple output values, as you would require here.


This gives the result you've asked for, but does rely on each Class value only having one row for each of m1 and m2:

declare @t table (Class char(2) not null,Member varchar(4) not null,Value int not null)
insert into @t(Class,Member,Value) values
('c1','m1',10),
('c1','m2',20),
('c1','list',30),
('c1','list',40),
('c1','list',50),
('c2','m1',60),
('c2','m2',70),
('c2','list',80)

select l.Class,m1.Value as m1,m2.Value as m2,l.Value as list
from
    @t l
        inner join
    @t m1
        on
            l.Class = m1.Class and
            m1.Member = 'm1'
        inner join
    @t m2
        on
            l.Class = m2.Class and
            m2.Member = 'm2'where
l.Member='list'

Result:

Class m1          m2          list
----- ----------- ----------- -----------
c1    10          20          30
c1    10          20          40
c1    10          20          50
c2    60          70          80

If there are multiple rows for m1 and m2, and you just want, say, the MAX values for them, then you'd make m1 and m2 in my above query subqueries:

...
    inner join
(select Class,MAX(Value) from @t where Member='m1' group by Class) m1
    on
        l.Class = m1.Class
...
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for trying, but I did say that I dont want any alternatives like CASEes other than to stick with PIVOT. I fully aware that there could be many other ways to solve it. Just out from those many ways, I want something from PIVOT. –  user1589188 Jan 24 '13 at 8:02
    
@user1589188 - well, I could update my answer and just have it say "no" - but I didn't think that would make for a very useful answer (even though it's correct) –  Damien_The_Unbeliever Jan 24 '13 at 8:07
    
Thank you. I actually do appreciate when people can bravely answer "no", with all his knowledge. I truly am. But we all know that it is usually hard to come up with "no" as the answer. Mostly, it is just hard to do rather than no. –  user1589188 Jan 24 '13 at 8:14
    
@user1589188 - or, to put it another way - we didn't need MS to add PIVOT to SQL Server - we could do pivots before it was introduced (by using aggregates with CASE expressions, as you said) - so it's effectively syntactic sugar for a simple case. If the simple case doesn't do what you want it to do, then you have to abandon the sugar and revert to doing the pivot "by hand". –  Damien_The_Unbeliever Jan 24 '13 at 8:15
    
Yes, I fully understand your point. An in fact, my question was exactly asking about whether we can use this nice sugar, with some touches to solve a slightly complex problem or not. My heading, content, were never meant to ask for the ways to solve the problem. So I would accept "no" as a valid answer, with prove or explanation. –  user1589188 Jan 24 '13 at 8:22
SELECT  a.*, 
        b.Value
FROM    
        (
            SELECT  Class,
                    MAX(CASE WHEN Member = 'm1' THEN Value ELSE NULL END) [Member 1],
                    MAX(CASE WHEN Member = 'm2' THEN Value ELSE NULL END) [Member 2]
            FROM  tableName
            GROUP BY Class
        ) a 
        INNER JOIN
        (
            SELECT  Class, Value
            FROM    tableName 
            WHERE   Member = 'List'
        ) b ON a.Class = b.Class

RESULT

╔═══════╦══════════╦══════════╦═══════╗
║ CLASS ║ MEMBER 1 ║ MEMBER 2 ║ VALUE ║
╠═══════╬══════════╬══════════╬═══════╣
║ c1    ║       10 ║       20 ║    30 ║
║ c1    ║       10 ║       20 ║    40 ║
║ c1    ║       10 ║       20 ║    50 ║
║ c2    ║       60 ║       70 ║    80 ║
╚═══════╩══════════╩══════════╩═══════╝
share|improve this answer
1  
Isn't that the same result as the normal pivot, the one the OP said they didn't want? –  Damien_The_Unbeliever Jan 24 '13 at 7:43
    
@Damien_The_Unbeliever yes fixed. –  John Woo Jan 24 '13 at 7:54
    
Thanks for trying, but I did say that I dont want any alternatives like CASEes other than to stick with PIVOT. I fully aware that there could be many other ways to solve it. Just out from those many ways, I want something from PIVOT. –  user1589188 Jan 24 '13 at 8:01
    
@JW. Out of interest, how did you generate the ascii table image? :-) –  Bridge Jan 24 '13 at 8:37

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