Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have read some intro articles to nodejs and it seems like a fun way of creating webapps. However, i'm not sure if i understand the "only one thread" and "event loop" so i hope someone can clarify for me.

Lets say i have a function "computeBigNumbers(data, callback)". Now, when a http request is made i call this function and supply a callback for when it's done. In the "computeBigNumbers" function, if i don't specifically run the code in a child process or start a web worker thread, will it be async? I'm thinking no. Correct?

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

In the "computeBigNumbers" function, if i don't specifically run the code in a child process or start a web worker thread, will it be async?

... or call another async function.

But yes, there is only one thread in node.js, and it is your responsibility not to block it (by making time-consuming tasks explicitly asynchronous).

I/O lends itself to callbacks, but if you have a CPU-heavy operation, then you probably need to farm it out to a web worker or child process. An intense loop in Javascript or a synchronous call into a C function will have the whole server wait for you.

share|improve this answer
    
Great, thanks:) –  Trj Jan 24 '13 at 7:46
    
Also, if i wanted my node application to behave like a traditional server i could just start a new child process with every request, right? –  Trj Jan 24 '13 at 8:12
    
That would defeat the purpose of node, though. If it is I/O heavy, a single thread can handle lots of concurrent requests. When you write for node, you already pay the mental cost of all these callbacks, that investment would be wasted. –  Thilo Jan 24 '13 at 8:19
    
It was just a thought experiment, to see if i understood it correctly, i'm not going to do that:) –  Trj Jan 24 '13 at 8:34

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.