Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I'm attempting to deobfuscate some Java .class files after decompiling them, and I've come across a part of the code where it's using labels in a way I don't think they can be used. I don't know if this is the decompiler's fault in misunderstanding the labels, or if the code was intentionally obfuscated this way. In other words, can labels be used this way in Java bytecode?

Note that the labels appear AFTER the related break statements, not before. It almost seems to be using them as a goto, rather than a label being used to go out of a loop. There are also no loops at all, so I'm a bit confused as to how they're supposed to be used here.

What's going on here? I've marked the 3 labels in comments (###)

if (i != 96)
  {
    if ((i ^ 0xFFFFFFFF) != -98)
    {
      if (i == 98)
        break label417;  // ### Here are the three breaks... The relevant labels appear later in the code
      if (i != 99)
        break label540;
      if (!bool)
        break label461;
    }
  }
  else
  {
    if (localwb == this.localWB5)
    {
      if (this.localWB4 != null) {
          this.localWB4.a((byte)-92, this);
        if (!bool);
      }
      else
      {
          this.localWB6.a((byte)-9, this);
      }
      return true;
    }
    if (localwb == this.localWB4)
    {
        this.localWB6.a((byte)-59, this);
      return true;
    }
    if (this.localWB3 != localwb)
      break label540;
      this.localWB2.a((byte)-38, this);
    return true;
  }
  if (this.localWB6 == localwb)
  {
    if (this.localWB4 != null) {
        this.localWB4.a((byte)-122, this);
      if (!bool);
    }
    else {
        this.localWB5.a((byte)-63, this);
    }
    return true;
  }
  if (this.localWB4 == localwb)
  {
    this.localWB5.a((byte)-22, this);
    return true;
  }
  if ((this.localWB2 == localwb) && (this.localWB3.M))
  {
    this.localWB3.a((byte)-84, this);
    return true;
    label417:  //  ### The first label.  Note how this next if-statement has inaccessible code... if the above if-statement is true, it would have already returned true;  However, the label appears after the return statement, almost as if the label is being used as a goto.
    if (localwb == this.localWB2)
    {
        this.localWB6.a((byte)-86, this);
      return true;
    }
    if (this.localWB3 == localwb)
    {
      this.localWB5.a((byte)-31, this);
      return true;
      label461:  //  ###  The second label
      if ((this.localWB6 == localwb) || (this.localWB4 == localwb))
      {
          this.localWB2.a((byte)-60, this);
        return true;
      }
      if (localwb == this.localWB5)
      {
        if (this.localWB3.M)
        {
          this.localWB3.a((byte)-44, this);
          if (!bool);
        }
        else {
            this.localWB2.a((byte)-9, this);
        }
        return true;
      }
    }
  }
  label540:  //  ###  The final label.
share|improve this question
1  
(I think the more interesting question is, if the byte-code itself can express a "traditional" block-cutting GOTO, and to what extent - valid Java syntax itself cannot.) – user166390 Jan 24 '13 at 7:45
2  
What does the Java compiler say when you try to compile it again? – Thilo Jan 24 '13 at 7:46
1  
Where is this code from? Was it just obfuscated? Or the result of some cross-compilation from some non-Java source with maybe its own bytecode? – Thilo Jan 24 '13 at 7:50
    
FWIW, when I try to compile Java with a label after the break, it says "The label is missing". – Thilo Jan 24 '13 at 8:03
    
How to know the scope of a label in this code? is that the statement only right after the label ? – nish1013 Nov 7 '13 at 15:53
up vote 5 down vote accepted

The goto bytecode instruction (yes, it's actually called "goto") is used to implement break and other constructs.

The specification of goto itself only restricts the target to be within the same method as the goto instruction.

There are many other constraints that are defined in 4.10. Verification of class Files, specifically in Checking Code, which describes how the actual bytecode of a method is to be verified.

I suspect that you can't produce inconsistent interpretation of the local variables and operand stacks with goto, for example by requiring the target instruction to be compatible with the source instruction, but I the actual specification is written in Prolog and I'd be thankful if anyone got the relevant point where this is ensured.

share|improve this answer
    
I wonder if this can result in "unsafe" jumps where the allocation of local variables on the stack becomes inconsistent. Are those all decided at the head of the method and then set in stone? – Thilo Jan 24 '13 at 8:07
    
@Thilo: I seem to remember some restriction with regard to this, but can't find it in the JVM at the moment. If anywhere, it would be in 4.10. Verification of class Files. – Joachim Sauer Jan 24 '13 at 8:08
1  
"4.10.2.2. The Bytecode Verifier " talks about data-flow analysis and counting number of local variables for every instruction. Probably got this case covered ... – Thilo Jan 24 '13 at 8:14
    
Thanks, this answer was helpful :) I may have to just edit the if-statements themselves and remove the labels. – Khalid Mahmoud Jan 24 '13 at 8:20
    
@Thilo, the VM imposes static type checking to make sure that the code is safe, and you can't do stuff like access uninitialized values or interpret an integer as a pointer. However, the checking is a bit more lax than Java. For example, booleans are just turned into ints meaning you can have values other than false (0) and true (1) and interfaces are not checked until runtime. – Antimony Feb 1 '13 at 18:35

break <label> can be used to exit code blocks, like so:

public static boolean is_answer(int arg) {
    boolean ret = false;
    label: {
        if (arg != 42)
            break label;
        ret = true;
    }
    return ret;
}

However, the decompiled code that you show is not valid Java due to the following JLS requirement:

A break statement transfers control out of an enclosing statement.

share|improve this answer
    
Why does the code violate the quoted JLS section? All labels are in the same method as the break. – Thilo Jan 24 '13 at 7:56
    
@Thilo: Poor choice of quote on my part, corrected. – NPE Jan 24 '13 at 7:59
    
Not sure I like that quote better. Those jumps break out of enclosing statements. They also jump right into the middle of other blocks, which does seem like it should be illegal. – Thilo Jan 24 '13 at 8:01
    
The breaks are not inside of the any labelled blocks of code, they appear before and outside of them. The bytecode itself was obfuscated, so I don't know what the real working code is supposed to look like. – Khalid Mahmoud Jan 24 '13 at 8:02
    
@Khalid what code are you trying to understand? Is it something you can legally share and reverse engineer? Because if so, I might be able to figure it out. – Antimony Feb 1 '13 at 18:40

The problem stems from a mismatch between Java and bytecode. Java imposes a lot of restrictions that aren't present at the bytecode level. If all you're doing is decompiling a normal compiled Java classfile, this won't be a problem. However, obfuscators will usually rearrange the control flow of the method into an equivalent version that no longer corresponds to valid Java. A naive decompiler will get confused and just emit invalid Java, as you've seen.

If you are interested in decompiling obfuscated classfiles, you can try the open source Krakatau Decompiler I wrote. It is much smarter about trying to transform obfuscated bytecode back into valid Java, so it can often decompile classes which no other decompiler can. However, the resulting code will probably not be pretty even if it is valid, and the decompiler may still fail.

share|improve this answer

Whenever I have a question about the Java language and how it is written, I refer to the handy Java Language Specification, which is very thorough documentation.

From 14.15. The break statement:

A break statement must refer to a label within the immediately enclosing method, constructor, or initializer. There are no non-local jumps. If no labeled statement with Identifier as its label in the immediately enclosing method, constructor, or initializer contains the break statement, a compile-time error occurs.

I don't see anything there that says the label of break label; has to be before or 'surround' the break.

share|improve this answer
3  
Note that for the bytecode the Java Language specification is less interesting. What you want to read is the Java Virtual Machine Specification. – Joachim Sauer Jan 24 '13 at 8:00

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.