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So I am trying to program in C++ a linked list but I'm not sure how to do it exactly. I understand the concept more or less and I saw a tutorial that gave me this code but it didn't explain it too well. I was wondering if you all could help me with the next steps, explain to me what I just did, and explain to me how to continue. I want it to add elements, pop or push elements in a stacked manner, last in first out, and free elements at the end and free up the memory to prevent memory leaks. thank you.

    #include <iostream>
using namespace std;

struct node
{
    int num;
    node *link;
}*p;

void main()
{
    node *root;

    root = new node;
    root->num=5;
    root->link = p;
    p = root;

    node *q;

    for(q = p; q != NULL; q = q->link)
    {
        cout<<q->num;
        cout<<endl;
    }
}
share|improve this question

closed as not a real question by phresnel, BЈовић, Mario Sannum, ElYusubov, John Koerner Jan 25 '13 at 0:20

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
There are incredibly many questions on linked lists in C++ already... many of them have code for push and pop etc. as well... – jogojapan Jan 24 '13 at 8:03
1  
What you just did: apparently, copy some code without understanding it. How to continue: read up on C++ to understand the code before writing any more. If you are stuck with any specific point, ask question on SO. – juanchopanza Jan 24 '13 at 8:08
up vote 0 down vote accepted

First of all, since you already use the standard library (#include <iostream>), be informed that the standard library already have lists: (#include <list>) as well as other containers.

You can find their documentation here

In case you want to write yourself, use a proper approach: don't put everything into main, but define a proper class and methods to manipulate the elements. You can refer to the standard documentation I linked as a "inspiration".

You will probably end-up with something like

class list
{
    struct element
    {
        element* pnext;
        int value;
    };

    element* root;

public:

    list() :root() 
    {}

    ~list() 
    { while(root) pop(); }

    list(const list&) =delete;

    list& operator=(const list&) =delete;

    void push(int val) 
    { 
        element* p = new element;
        p->value = val;
        p->pnext = root;
        root = p;
    }

    void pop()
    {
        element* pe = root;
        root = pe->pnext;
        delete pe;
    }

    class index
    {
        element* p;
        index(element* s) :p(s) {}
        friend class list;
    };

    index start() const const 
    { return index(root); }

    index next(index i) const 
    { return index(i.p->pnext); }

    int at(index i) const 
    { return i.p->value; }

    bool is_end(index i) const 
    { return i.p == nullptr; }
};
share|improve this answer

A simple linked list demo

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

typedef struct NODE
{
    int value;
    NODE *next;
};



int main()
{
    int opt;
    NODE *root = NULL;
    NODE *tmp = NULL;
    NODE *last = NULL;
    do
    {
        cout << "Simple Singly Linked-List Example\n\n";
        cout << "\t1. Create Root\n";
        cout << "\t2. Add Node\n";
        cout << "\t3. Delete First Node\n";
        cout << "\t4. Display Last Node\n";
        cout << "\t5. Display Nodes\n";
        cout << "\t6. Exit Program.\n\n";

        cout << "Enter a choice : ";
        cin >> opt;

        switch (opt)
        {

            case 1: // create root;
                if (root != NULL) // root already exists no need to ceate one
                {
                    cout << "Root already exists\n\n";
                    break;
                }

                root = new NODE;
                cout << "Enter Value for new Node : ";
                cin >> root->value;
                root->next = NULL;

                // root & last will be same for the when the node count is ONE
                last = root;
                cout << "\nRoot node has been created successfully\nPress any key to continue...\n\n";
                cin.get();

                break;

            case 2:
                if (root == NULL)
                {
                    cout << "Create root node first\n\n";
                    break;
                }

                tmp = new NODE;
                cout << "Enter Value for new Node : ";
                cin >> tmp->value;
                tmp->next = NULL;
                // attach it to the last node
                last->next = tmp;


                //set newly created node as last node
                last = tmp;
                cout << "\nRoot node has been created successfully\nPress any key to continue...\n\n";
                cin.get();
                break;

            case 3:
                if (root == NULL)
                {
                    cout << "No nodes to delete\n\n";
                    break;
                }

                // we have to delete the root node and set the next node as root
                tmp = root->next;
                cout << "Deleted the node with value : " << root->value << "\nPress any key to continue...\n\n";
                delete root;
                cin.get();

                //set second node as root now
                root = tmp;
                break;

            case 4:
                if (root == NULL)
                {
                    cout << "No nodes to delete\n\n";
                    break;
                }

                // delete the very last node (easy) and update the next pointer of second last node to null (tricky)

                //first lets find the second last node
                tmp = root;
                while(tmp->next != NULL)
                {
                    tmp = tmp->next;
                }
                //update the second last node next pointer to null
                cout << "Deleted the node with value : " << last->value << "\nPress any key to continue...\n\n";
                cin.get();
                delete last;

                //update second last one as last node
                last = tmp;
                last->next = NULL;

                break;
            case 5:
                if (root == NULL)
                {
                    cout << "No nodes to disply\n\n";
                    break;
                }

                tmp = root;
                cout << "Node Values  : ";
                while(tmp)
                {
                    cout << tmp->value << ",\t";
                    // set to print next node
                    if (tmp->next)
                        tmp = tmp-next;
                    else
                        break;

                }
                cout << "\nPress any key to continue\n\n";
                cin.get();
                break;

            default:
                cout << "Invalid Option\n\nPress any key to continue...\n\n";
                cin.get();

        }
    }while(opt != 6);

    // always a good practise to delete objects u have created;
    tmp = root;
    while(tmp)
    {
        //sorry for using the last node pointer, dont seems subtle
        last = tmp;
        tmp = tmp->next;
        cout << "Deleted Node with value : " << last->value << "\n";
        delete last;
    }

    return 0;
}

Check a couple of links regarding the Linked List

Link # 1

Link # 2

Link # 3 <-- very useful, i still have it in bookmarks

Link # 4 <-- singly - linked list, the basic of all!

share|improve this answer
2  
This should be a comment. – juanchopanza Jan 24 '13 at 8:05
1  
with multiple links it would look like a little more then a mess! – PaRiMaL RaJ Jan 24 '13 at 8:07
    
Are you going to explain how linked lists are done as well, or is the answer complete? Some of these links are very good, but at some point they will be dead. – jogojapan Jan 24 '13 at 8:18
    
ill create a proper tut & update the answer in a bit! – PaRiMaL RaJ Jan 24 '13 at 8:20
    
@AppDeveloper: It would not have been a mess; to make it an answer, please describe what you mean and what those linked pages say. – phresnel Jan 24 '13 at 8:42

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