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I am adding two numbers, but I don't get a correct value.

For example, doing 1 + 2 returns 12 and not 3

What am I doing wrong in this code?

<html>
  <body>
    <p>Click the button to calculate x.</p>
    <button onclick="myFunction()">Try it</button>
    <br/>
    <br/>Enter first number:
    <input type="text" id="txt1" name="text1">Enter second number:
    <input type="text" id="txt2" name="text2">
    <p id="demo"></p>
    <script>
      function myFunction() {
        var y = document.getElementById("txt1").value;
        var z = document.getElementById("txt2").value;
        var x = y + z;
        document.getElementById("demo").innerHTML = x;
      }
    </script>
  </body>
</html>
share|improve this question
    
What type of values are you expecting as input? Integers or decimals? –  Zorayr Jan 24 '13 at 8:20
    
A text input value will be string and strings will always concatenate instead of addition –  hank Jan 24 '13 at 8:27
    
A good write-up on converting is in this Answer. –  akTed Jan 24 '13 at 8:29

11 Answers 11

up vote 40 down vote accepted

They are actually strings not numbers. The easiest way to produce a number from a string is to prepend it with+:

var x = +y + +z;
share|improve this answer
    
out of curiousity (myself not a JavaScript programmer) (and I think this would improve the answer), what does the +-prefix do with strings? –  phresnel Jan 24 '13 at 8:10
4  
The above code is a bit bizarre and will confuse less seasoned developers. The code will also fail JSLint for confusing use of '+'. –  Zorayr Jan 24 '13 at 8:23
    
@phresnel: unary + operators –  akTed Jan 24 '13 at 8:28
2  
@AKTed: Actually I wanted to provoke elclanrs to describe it a bit within his answer. Of course I am not unable to do the google search myself; but it would (imo) improve the quality of the answer, especially because using prefix-+ for string conversion is pretty uncommon in other programming languages and might confuse newbies. (however, thanks for sharing the link) –  phresnel Jan 24 '13 at 8:37
    
True. But, if you have in your minds-eye a better-quality Answer but don't want to just post your own because it's just duplicating with some expansion, you could improve the Answer yourself. :) Answerer(s) might not deliver, for any number of reasons. –  akTed Jan 24 '13 at 8:45

You need to use javaScript's parseInt() method to turn the strings back into numbers. Right now they are strings so adding two strings concatenates them, which is why you're getting "12".

share|improve this answer
1  
I'm not sure parseInt() is the best option here given that the OP's function is adding two user-entered "numbers", not two "integers". –  nnnnnn Jan 24 '13 at 8:17
1  
@nnnnnn I think, that could easily be amended with parseFloat should the OP provide more input. –  Yoshi Jan 24 '13 at 8:25
    
@Yoshi - Yes, yes it could, but given that the answer doesn't actually say anywhere that parseInt() only returns integers, and doesn't explain any of parseInt()'s "quirks" - which could be a problem with user-entered data - I thought it was worth mentioning. (I didn't actually downvote or anything.) –  nnnnnn Jan 24 '13 at 8:42
    
Yes, I had made an assumption that the input would be integers since they gave an example of 1 + 2, but you're right - parseFloat() may be better if they are just any 'numbers'. –  mitim Jan 24 '13 at 9:23

I just use Number():

var i=2;  
var j=3;  
var k = Number(i) + Number(j); // 5  
share|improve this answer
    
Good Got it....! –  Sajith Jan 30 at 10:28

Use parseInt(...) but make sure you specify a radix value; otherwise you will run into several bugs (if the string begins with "0", the radix is octal/8 etc.).

var x = parseInt(stringValueX, 10);
var y = parseInt(stringValueY, 10);

alert(x + y);

Hope this helps!

share|improve this answer
1  
I'm not sure parseInt() is the best option here given that the OP's function is adding two user-entered "numbers", not two "integers". –  nnnnnn Jan 24 '13 at 8:16
1  
Unless he is expecting floating point values, I think using this approach still works great. –  Zorayr Jan 24 '13 at 8:24

boss just add a simple type casting method as the input is taken in text use following

    var y = parseInt(document.getElementById("txt1").value);
    var z = parseInt(document.getElementById("txt2").value);
    var x = y + z;
share|improve this answer

An alternative solution, just sharing :) :

var x = (y/1)+ (z/1);
share|improve this answer
    
have a look at my about page; I don't think "Try this"-answers without any further explanation are for stack-overflow. –  phresnel Jan 24 '13 at 8:38
    
Repeating what is already in two other answers isn't very useful either, unless you have something different to add by way of explanation. –  nnnnnn Jan 24 '13 at 8:44
    
As per your comments, I've replaced my answer with a new one. Have a nice day :) ! –  Sankar V Jan 24 '13 at 9:31

Hey Friends Its Very Simple

<html>
<body>
<p>Click the button to calculate x.</p>
<button onclick="myFunction()">Try it</button>
<br/>
<br/>Enter first number:
<input type="text" id="txt1" name="text1">Enter second number:
<input type="text" id="txt2" name="text2">
<p id="demo"></p>
<script>
  function myFunction() {
    var y = document.getElementById("txt1").value;
    var z = document.getElementById("txt2").value;
    var x = +y + +z;
    document.getElementById("demo").innerHTML = x;
  }
</script>

share|improve this answer

var x = +y + +z; it's the correct and best suited way...as it also works when you are taking values for y and z through prompt.. :)

share|improve this answer

try this

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
<body>

<p> Add Section </p>

<label>First No :</label>
<input id="txt1"  type="text"/><br />
<label>Second No :</label>
<input id="txt2"  type="text"/><br />

<input type="button" name="Add" value="Add" onclick="addTwoNumber()"/>
<p id="demo"></p>
<script>
function myFunction() {
    document.getElementById("demo").innerHTML = Date();
}

function addTwoNumber(){
    var a = document.getElementById("txt1").value;
    var b = document.getElementById("txt2").value;

    var x = Number(a) + Number(b);
    document.getElementById("demo").innerHTML = "Add Value: " + x;
}
</script>

</body>
</html> 
share|improve this answer

You can do a precheck with regular expression wheather they are numbers as like

function myFunction() {
    var y = document.getElementById("txt1").value;
    var z = document.getElementById("txt2").value;
    if((x.search(/[^0-9]/g) != -1)&&(y.search(/[^0-9]/g) != -1))
      var x = Number(y)+ Number(z);
    else
      alert("invalid values....");
    document.getElementById("demo").innerHTML = x;
  }
share|improve this answer
    
Instead of regular expressions you could just use parseXX and check for NaN return. –  hank Jan 24 '13 at 8:30
    
Validating user-entered data is always a good plan, but you still need to convert the input strings to numeric form before you can do a numeric addition. –  nnnnnn Jan 24 '13 at 8:36
    
yeah thats right.. I should have used Number(value).. –  Ram Jan 24 '13 at 9:01

An alternative solution, just sharing :) :

var result=eval(num1)+eval(num2);

share|improve this answer

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