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I had some class like this:

class Test {
public:
    bool bar(int &i, char c) // some arguments are passed by ref, some are by value
    {/*...*/}
    bool foo(/*...*/)
    {}
};

And I don't want repeatly call bar1/bar2, etc. and then check the return value again and again, so I wrote a macro and variadic template to handle those things

#define help_macro(object, memfn, ...) help_func(#object "." #memfn, \
        object, &decltype(object)::memfn, ##__VA_ARGS__)

template<class T, typename Func, typename... Args>
void help_func(char const * name, T &&object, Func memfn, Args&&... args)
{
    auto ret = (object.*memfn)(forward<Args>(args)...);
    cout<<name<<":\t"
        <<(ret ? "OK" : "Oops")  // maybe I'll throw an exception here  
        <<endl;
}

And use it like this

int i = 0;
Test t;
help_macro(t, bar, i, 'a');

It works on g++-4.7/Debian, but ICC13.0/Win refuses to compile it(a very strange error message)

main.cpp(37): error : type name is not allowed
help_macro(t, bar, i, 'a');
^
main.cpp(37): error : expected a ")"
help_macro(t, bar, i, 'a');
^

I turn on the C++11 for ICC, and confirmed that ICC13 support variadic template and decltype Do I use it incorrectly or it's ICC's problem?

share|improve this question
1  
I am not sure, but I would suggest avoiding the forwarding. You don't seem to be inspecting the arguments, so you could avoid the forwarding and do just #define help_macro(call, ...) help_function(#call, call(__VA_ARGS__)) and template <typename ReturnT> help_function(const char *name, T &&ret) { cout << name << ":\t" <<(ret ? "OK" : "Oops") <<endl; }. It's a bit shorter, more general (works for static functions too) and does not strain the compiler so much. –  Jan Hudec Jan 24 '13 at 9:11
    
help_macro(t, bar, i, 'a');. you mean bar2 right? There is no 'bar' in 'Test' (as indicated in error message) –  Chubsdad Jan 24 '13 at 9:30
1  
this looks like the type of hack to be avoided if you want to maintain readability (by humans). –  Walter Jan 24 '13 at 9:34
    
Sorry guys, it's my mistake. PS, could I use <s> </s> in code? seems it's useless. It's my first post to stackoverflow :( –  Jason Jan 24 '13 at 10:03
    
hi, @JanHudec Thanks for your advice, your codes are really clear and clean –  Jason Jan 24 '13 at 11:17

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Edit: Having actually bothered to test my theory it turns out I was wrong, in that context decltype(t) is Test as can be shown by a static_assert(std::is_same<decltype(t), Test>::value, "not a reference")

So ICC (or the EDG front end it uses) probably just doesn't properly support using decltype in nested-name-specifiers, which was changed by DR 743

Using std::decay does make ICC accept it though, and so is a useful workaround.

Original, wrong, answer:

I think ICC is right here, decltype(object) is actually Test& and a reference type cannot have members, so &decltype(t)::memfn is ill-formed.

The code can be simplified to:

struct Test {
    void foo() {}
};

int main()
{
  Test t;
  auto p = &decltype(t)::foo;
}

Which G++ and Clang accept, but ICC rejects, correctly IMHO.

You can fix it by using std::remove_reference or std::decay

#include <type_traits>

// ...

Test t;
auto p = &std::decay<decltype(t)>::type::foo;
share|improve this answer
    
Off-topic maybe, but why doesn't the :: operator discard references? Would an implicit decay be undesirable sometimes? –  Potatoswatter Jan 24 '13 at 14:24
    
Good question, I don't know the answer. [expr.prim.general] specifically says "The type denoted by a decltype-specifier in a nested-name-specifier shall be a class or enumeration type." –  Jonathan Wakely Jan 24 '13 at 14:28
    
Oh actually that's a post-C++11 DR open-std.org/jtc1/sc22/wg21/docs/cwg_defects.html#1440, this is also related open-std.org/jtc1/sc22/wg21/docs/cwg_active.html#1586, and the change to allow decltype(T)::mem was open-std.org/jtc1/sc22/wg21/docs/cwg_defects.html#743 –  Jonathan Wakely Jan 24 '13 at 14:48
    
According to that chronology, the late change to C++11 was to allow the grammar production, and the defect report additionally specifies that references are disallowed. So moving forward, std::decay is the way to go and actually using the feature per 743 is a bad idea unless you have the declaration on hand, and a bad habit in general. –  Potatoswatter Jan 25 '13 at 0:38
    
yes, I agree. In the specific example in this question decltype(t) is not a reference, but in the general case it could be, so using decay or remove_reference should be either harmless or make the code do the right thing –  Jonathan Wakely Jan 25 '13 at 1:07

I think the reason is there is no 'bar' function in class Test but not sure as I don't have access to this compiler. However the error message you posted shows there is an attempt to use 'bar'.

The following works on both gcc and clang

class Test {
public:
    bool bar1(int &i, char c) // some arguments are passed by ref, some are by value
    {return true;}
    bool bar2(int &i, char c)
    {return true;}
};

#define help_macro(object, memfn, ...) help_func(#object "." #memfn, \
        object, &decltype(object)::memfn, ##__VA_ARGS__)

template<class T, typename Func, typename... Args>
void help_func(char const * name, T &&object, Func memfn, Args&&... args)
{
    auto ret = (object.*memfn)(std::forward<Args>(args)...);
    std::cout<<name<<":\t"
        <<(ret ? "OK" : "Oops")  // maybe I'll throw an exception here
        <<std::endl;
}

int main()
{
    int i = 0;
    Test t;
    //help_macro(t, bar, i, 'a');
    help_macro(t, bar2, i, 'a');
}
share|improve this answer
    
It's a typo, Sorry about that. I copied my code and modified it:( –  Jason Jan 24 '13 at 9:56

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